neoformation


Also found in: Medical.

neoformation

[¦nē·ō·fȯr′mā·shən]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
demonstrated that the HeNe laser is capable of inducing cartilage neoformation [11].
A portion of this would then be free for neoformation as metastable and stable secondary minerals.
In order for this signature to be robust and detectable in whole soil chemistry, relatively low concentrations of cations and sufficient time of weathering, biocycling, and neoformation (clay formation) are hypothesised.
Red Brown Earth soils of the south-east district situated on stable, low-gradient geomorphic surfaces and with significant atmospheric input (Murray River mud) have developed a geochemistry resulting from clay formation and neoformation that occurred under the influence of a biologically fractionated soil exchange pool.
This relationship demonstrates that weathering and clay formation, or neoformation, has occurred in conjunction with biocycling of cations.
terebinthifolius Raddi, that a sanguineous clot was present in a large part of the samples, while lymphocytic and histiocytic infiltrates, granulation tissue, bone resorption, fibrosis and bone neoformation were visualized in all the specimens.
It was possible to observe after 15 days of treatment, bony neoformation in all cases.
Neoformation of secondary magnetite with maghemite resulting from the precipitation of iron from the soil solution--a process which can also occur in surface horizons.
Neoformation is possible by transformation from precursor minerals, most commonly smectite and/or illite.
Alteration and weathering of the basic minerals contained in some of the clasts, in addition to interstitial solutions rich in Si and Mg, had created the chemical environment required for palygorskite neoformation.
Szendroi M, Deodhar A: Synovial neoformations and tumours.
Traumatic neuroma is a well-defined clinicopathologic entity that is seldom associated with vascular neoformations.