Neo-Impressionism

(redirected from neoimpressionism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to neoimpressionism: Post impressionism, Chromoluminarism
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Neo-Impressionism

 

an art trend that originated around 1885 in France, where its principal representatives were G. Seurat and P. Signac. Neo-impressionism spread to Belgium (T. van Rysselberghe), Italy (G. Segantini), and other countries. In developing the principles of late impressionism, which was marked by an intensified interest in optic phenomena, the neo-impressionists sought to apply the latest discoveries in optics to art. They methodically broke down complex color tones into pure colors. Seeking to overcome the haphazard and fragmentary nature of impressionist compositions, the neo-impressionists resorted to decorative, two-dimensional compositional solutions. The cerebral method of neo-impressionism often led to the predominance of cold intellectualism and to a dry abstractness of images.

REFERENCES

Signac, P. Ot Ezh. Delakrua k neoimpressionizmu, Moscow, 1913.
Rewald, J. Postimpressionism. Leningrad-Moscow, 1962. (Translated from English.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, faced by a 'divided' painting, it is best to first stand at a sufficient distance in order to absorb the whole, before moving closer to study the chromatic effects up close." For the first 20 years of his career, he received little recognition and neoimpressionism received negative criticism, even by those who initially supported it.
Seurat used modern characters interacting in nature, illustrating them with a mixture of colors creating a vivid and luminous effect, initiating the new direction of "Neoimpressionism."
Founded, about 1886, upon the recently formulated optical and color theories of such scientists as Edouard Root and Michel Eugene Chevreul, neoimpressionism sought to create a scientific method for the empirical division of tone used by the impressionists (see impressionism ).
In his short but productive life, this renowned painter founded a new art movement, neoimpressionism or pointillism.