neologism

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neologism

A new word or new meaning for an existing word. The high-tech field routinely creates new meanings for words. Before 1980, there was no doubt that a "mouse" referred only to a furry rodent.
References in periodicals archive ?
This solution is superior to previous ones in that it covers all endocentric compounds with nominal non-heads and accounts for virtually all of them, with the exception of some archaic and neologistic patterns.
Consider Tiger Woods, whose neologistic self-description refers to the fact that he is part white, part black, part American Indian, part Thai, and part Chinese.
The exclusive use of lowercase letters, which has become an unreflected convention for so much poetry these days, routinely announces a linguistic consciousness and usually would add a fluid uncertainty to the "signifiers," but here that convention is at odds with Schmidt's preference for big, sometimes striking, polysyllabic and neologistic compound nouns that halt rhythms or narrative developments and assert a static monumentality.
12 This last term, "semiosis" (sometimes "semeiosis" or "semeiosy"), is Peirce's own neologistic adaptation of the Greek term [Greek Text Omitted], which occurs at least thirty times in the Herculanean papyrus On Signs authored in the first century by Philodemus; see Philodemus, On Methods of Inference (c.
This applies particularly to diu gotes bovescheit, generally assumed to be a neologistic coinage of Hartmann's (though analogues occur in languages outside Middle High German).
After all, it might be argued that "Ziviehlisation" poses a neologistic conundrum that draws the implied reader into deeper reflection about the usage and make-up of words.
While the editorial group of transition frequently decried the impositions of grammar and the dictionary--Harry Crosby declared that the "New Word is the clean piercing of a Sword through the rotten carcass of the Dictionary" (In transition 89)--Zukofsky would deploy the dictionary to aims more radical than the neologistic or surrealistically inspired experiments most characteristic of the writing in transition.
Certainly, the `modern' qualities of Laforgue's poetry are clear enough: there is his exploration of free verse and his fascination with types of `social' subject matter; there is the daringly hybrid and neologistic vocabulary, and the often risque management of familiar romantic themes (Laforgue is said to be the first French poet to use the word `clitoris' in verse).