neologism

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neologism

A new word or new meaning for an existing word. The high-tech field routinely creates new meanings for words. Before 1980, there was no doubt that a "mouse" referred only to a furry rodent.
References in periodicals archive ?
This dictionary is one of the biggest achievements of Mordvin lexicography, not only for the great deal of information it contains, but also because of Damaskin's neologistic work that significantly contributed to the reform of the Mordvin literary standard language and to the improvement of its vocabulary.
If indeed wordplay were to be offered as a consideration here, a chapter on the works of Rabelais would certainly take precedence over Joyce, though countless earlier works in English alone, including Beowulf, are also full of paronomasia, neologistic or otherwise.
257) as if that neologistic trait were unusual in the nineteenth century; dissertations are cited even though they've been published as books; a derogatory adjective like 'shiftless' is put in quotation marks when describing ama Tonga but is naked before trekboers (pp.
Ideologie began as an advertising neologism for a universal science of society (Comtean sociologie would be the next neologistic claimant for such a status).
Meaning and unmeaning, sense and non-sense, collide here in the neologistic experimentations of Joyce's prose, a prose that reveals to us the material ground of signification that in other, less overt contexts, may remain hidden.
Specific word choices may cause some readers to accuse the authors of using overblown, foreign, and even neologistic words.
Wikipedia, itself the prime example of 'crowdsourcing knowledge', defines the term as follows: 'Crowdsourcing is a neologistic compound of Crowd and Outsourcing for the act of taking tasks traditionally performed by an employee or contractor, and outsourcing them to a group of people or community, through an "open call" to a large group of people (a crowd) asking for contributions', http://en.
E]ven the most shabby stores are emblazoned with neologistic sect names, signs listing the order of services, and posters listing references to biblical passages.
Indeed, lawfare suggested, in its neologistic form, something beyond the determinate law-war framework.
Meanwhile, as Russell Jacoby saw it, several discouraging trends emerged among (self-defined) 'radical' intellectuals: among them, perpetual abstract theory theorising about abstract theory; esotericism and indecipherable, neologistic prose justified for its purported subversive qualities; and most lamentable, a flight to technocratic amelioration and away from bolder emancipatory political vision.
Her sentences contained a lot of stop-and-go; they thought out loud, they broke into confidential dramatic asides, and they took seemingly wrong turns into neologistic diction.
Of course, these later writers had the paradoxical dual privilege of using their grandiloquent dramatic ancestors both as sources for a broadened vocabulary and as neologistic straw-men to be demonized.