neonatal

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neonatal

of or relating to newborn children, esp in the first week of life and up to four weeks old
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

neonatal

[¦nē·ə′nād·əl]
(medicine)
Pertaining to a newborn infant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficacy of bidirectional fiber-optic phototherapy for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Pediatrics 1997;99(5):E13.
Epidemiology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Pediatrics 1985;75:770-4.
Baral, "Risk of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in babies born to 'O' positive mothers: A prospective cohort study," Kathmandu University Medical Journal, vol.
Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and Rhesus disease of the newborn: Incidence and impairment estimates for 2010 at regional and global levels.
In most cases the cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was undetermined (19/26 (73%) of readmitted babies compared to 32/38 (84%) in "in-hospital" babies (p = 0.17)).
Long-term outcome of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: subjective and objective audiological measures.Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci 2003; 28: 507-13.
The classical controlled clinical trial reported by Mollison and Walker (8) and subsequent clinical experience has established exchange transfusion as the standard treatment for preventing bilirubin encephalopathy in severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Exchange transfusion is the most reliable and rapid method of removing bilirubin from the body.
Most cases of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are physiological and total serum bilirubin level less than 205 [micro]mol/L (12 mg/dL) usually has no serious consequences [7].
Our study also has few cases of these clinical conditions as a cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Gartner LM (2001) [16] stated in his study that insufficient caloric intake resulted from maternal and/or infant breast feeding difficulties may also increase unconjugated serum bilirubin concentration.
The corrected text is: "Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia test methods for G6PD mentions that 5 mL (not 50 mL) and 10 mL of blood are required."
Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NHB), one of the most common problems pediatricians encounter in their clinical practice, remains a topic of interest and debate (1,2).

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