neonatology

(redirected from neonatal medicine)
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Related to neonatal medicine: neonatology, perinatal medicine

neonatology

[¦nē·ə′nā′täl·ə·jē]
(medicine)
The study of the newborn up to 2 months of age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Ajay Misra, Managing Director of Nelson Hospital of Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine feels that, "Even living in posh houses behind closed doors and windows, with no proper ventilation and flow of clean air, poses a danger to lung health.
This training programme transfers specialized knowledge to Emirati citizens allowing them to become leaders of local neonatal critical care units and to provide committed long-term health leadership in the UAE," said Edward Lawson, MD, chief of neonatal medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine, who helped to design the training programme and will provide support to the fellows.
HELP: Joanna Bradshaw, Dr Elaine Boyle (senior lecturer in neonatal medicine at the University of Leicester) with Chris Read, Eleanor Deeley and Mark Holden
She confirms you have been employed at the Royal Preston Hospital as a clinical teaching fellow in neonatal medicine since January, 2009.
Median compensation topped $50,000 for medical directors in pathology, nephrology, neonatal medicine and cardiovascular surgery.
Neonatal Medicine Unit, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town
Neff Marlow, professor of neonatal medicine at the University of Nottingham, emphasized that it would not be appropriate to interpret the results as indicating that extreme prematurity is associated with a formal diagnosis of autism.
David Field, a professor of neonatal medicine, said medical advances that help older babies had failed to help younger ones.
Rymer (Kings College) and Ahmed (Medway Maritime Hospital) supply 80 practice stations with questions typical of objective structural clinical examinations (OSCEs) on obstetrics, gynecology, contraception, neonatal medicine, and sexually transmitted diseases.
While engaged in a fellowship in neonatal medicine, I was stimulated by Gerald Odell's 1959 paper, in which he used pharmacological arguments to explain how these drugs produced kernicterus by competitively interfering with bilirubin-albumin binding (1).
Two of these were treated at Leicester Royal Infirmary, where he is Professor of Neonatal Medicine.
Cain said at a conference on obstetrics, gynecology, perinatal medicine, neonatal medicine, and the law.