neophilia


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neophilia

/nee"oh-fil"-ee-*/ The trait of being excited and pleased by novelty. Common among most hackers, SF fans, and members of several other connected leading-edge subcultures, including the pro-technology "Whole Earth" wing of the ecology movement, space activists, many members of Mensa, and the Discordian/neo-pagan underground. All these groups overlap heavily and (where evidence is available) seem to share characteristic hacker tropisms for science fiction, music, and oriental food. The opposite tendency is "neophobia".
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References in periodicals archive ?
(1) The 'benefits perceived' of GMO/GMF and the 'health concerns' never been studied in the context of 'food neophilia,' 'knowledge about GMO/GMF' and 'GMF Labeling' in the case of GMO/GMF acceptance.
* The implementation of a questionnaire entitled "Do you enjoy new experiences?" or "The Neophilia scale", through which we are able to provide relevant data regarding the subjects' physical activity and the perception of new experiences according to the student's type (participating at Physical Education lessons or having medical exempts);
1), Elizabeth Miller argues that Morris considered avoidance of "waste" in all its senses a significant aspect of utopian life, and she interprets his essays, News from Nowhere, and his work for the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings as sustained attempts to reject "the neophilia, disposability, and planned obsolescence of capitalist production." Miller's article is a response to critics of the rarity and cost of Kelmscott Press books, but her arguments apply with equal force to other artifacts of Morris' literary and decorative artwork.
Therefore, although it has been beneficial that a link between cinema and modernism is no longer considered unworthy of scholarly attention, the risks of another special issue on cinema and modernism, with its associated idea of a 'special relationship', (17) include both discovering contexts that are just other forms and reducing modernism to neophilia. But the special issue is highly appropriate given the variety of points of contact between the two phenomena that contemporary scholarship has encompassed, in that it can accommodate a range of conceptions of the nature of this contact.
And thank goodness for that, Winifred Gallagher would argue, for without the challenge of the new and our capacity for neophilia, we'd be nowhere.
That is, sex-differentiated patterns of parental investment lead the low-investment parent (typically the male) to relatively benefit from risk taking, neophilia, and exploratory behavior, while the high-investment parent, typically the female, will not find such behavior advantageous.
Willimon laments "Neophilia," an unhealthy obsession with the new that infects preaching: pastors grope for new ideas in order to sate an insatiable public.
One of the most dismal but revealing features of Finn's book is his documentation of the trendy "Progressive" neophilia that has increasingly dominated our teachers' colleges and schools of education since the 1920s.