neophyte

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neophyte

1. a person newly converted to a religious faith
2. RC Church a novice in a religious order
References in periodicals archive ?
The 26 neophytes who have died since Congress made hazing a capital offense are proof that a punitive approach to hazing will not solve the problem.
Assistant State Prosecutor Alan Stewart Mariano issued subpoenas against 20 individuals who allegedly took part in the brutal initiation of four Tau Gamma Phi neophytes, including Servando.
As Milliken notes, the neophytes at San Jose did not comprise a single people but instead "represented 55 independent local tribes and spoke nine distinct languages.
Essential for fans of this idiosyncratic talent and a highly palatable introduction for curious neophytes.
For residents, it hardly succeeds at that, but neophytes will get an overview of the city's history from Tom Bradley's election to the mayor's job in 1973, through minority clashes the Latino union battle with hotels and the riots of 1992 and Antonio Villaraigosa's victory in the mayoral campaign last year.
It and its companion Dictionary Of Naval Terms are written for Navy neophytes who have a need to understand the language of their new profession--and for outsiders such as journalists.
The "little ones" are believers, neophytes in the faith.
While there is no straightforward solution, per se, to this problem, Dorothy Leonard, a professor of business administration at the Harvard Business School and a redoubtable expert on how organizations develop products (or fail to), and Walter Swap, a professor of psychology (emeritus) at Tufts University, have a recommendation: have knowledgeable people work with the neophytes such that the former can help the latter learn how they need to think.
Contributions from such Wiccan notables as Raven Grimassi, Selena Fox, and more provide articles for neophytes on specific focal points that influence a spritual choice or path.
Neophytes will quickly become absorbed in this captivating tale of politics, ambition, and misguided patriotism.
After fourteen years of dancing Balanchine, the Russians are no longer neophytes.
Such a hedge is unnecessary, however, because specialists and neophytes alike will find in this book many stimulating reflections by a prolific scholar whose work has spanned the period in question, from the rhetoriqueurs to Louise Labe to Montaigne.