decompression

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decompression

[dē·kəm′presh·ən]
(engineering)
Any procedure for the relief of pressure or compression.

decompression

The reduction of atmospheric pressure. Particularly, various techniques for preventing decompression sickness (also called caisson disease by gradual decompression. Decompression sickness is caused by the evolution of nitrogen bubbles in the body as a result of the effects of reduced atmospheric pressure. Normal symptoms of decompression sickness are the bends, chokes, and creeps; unconsciousness; and neurological symptoms. It can be potentially fatal if the original higher pressure is not restored. Fighter crews use pressure suits and pressure breathing to avoid the effects of decompression sickness. A sudden decrease in cabin pressure, which may be the result of either some component of the aircraft—such as doors, windows, or the cockpit canopy—giving way or a rupture taking place in the structure, is called explosive decompression. See also chokes and creeps.

decompression

The restoration of compressed data back to their original size. See data compression.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cubital tunnel syndrome: Anterior transposition as a logical approach to complete nerve decompression.
Optic nerve decompression in cranial base fibrous dysplasia.
Dellon's first series of patients treated with nerve decompression for foot neuropathy were published in 1992.
Nerve decompression in the legs improves sensation and decreases pain, just as it does in the upper extremities, Dr.
Facial nerve decompression does not improve facial function.
Matthew Kaufman performed the fifth successful phrenic nerve decompression to reverse diaphragm paralysis.
Despite the lack of rigorous study, surgical nerve decompression (ND), or neurolysis, has been employed for decades to treat leprous neuropathy.
In this study, we intended to find another visual prognostic factor of TSM by comparing the blood flow of central retina artery (CRA) pre- and post-operatively, and following up the outcomes of optic nerve decompression in TSM cases.
Modified radical mastoidectomy with canal wall down procedure is the most common surgical technique used for eradication of disease as well as facial nerve decompression.
The patient's symptoms subsided after facial nerve decompression via a transmastoid approach.
Other endoscopic procedures replacing the more conventional open procedures include endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) for epiphora (watery eye due to nasolacrimal duct obstruction), orbital decompression for Graves' orbitopathy, optic nerve decompression, drainage of fronto-ethmoidal mucoceles and external fronto-ethmoidectomies for persistent frontal sinus disease.
The sensory and motor deficit in the median nerve range has persisted for over a year and has not responded to treatment with nonsteroidal medications, steroids, and surgical lysis of adhesions and nerve decompression.