net primary production


Also found in: Acronyms.

net primary production

[′net ′prīm·ə·rē prə′dək·shən]
(ecology)
Over a specified period of time, the biomass or biocontent which is incorporated into a plant community.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of the geographical distribution of schools suggest a relationship between the number of schools recorded and environmental variables since the largest number of schools was observed during 2012, the year with the highest net primary production and the broadest geographic distribution (Fig.
Net primary production (NPP) and respiration (R) Maximum values of primary production rates were recorded in October/2009 (74.2 mgC [m.sup.-3] [h.sup.-1]), during a period of high dissolved organic carbon and TN:TP ratio, and in February/2010 (66.3 mgC [m.sup.-3] [h.sup.-1]), during a period of high temperature and chlorophyll a.
Denisenko, "Modeling the values of net primary production for the zonal vegetation of European Russia," Biology Bulletin, vol.
Although tropospheric ozone has been considered as an important environmental factor that controls terrestrial net primary production, its effect varies depending on regions [105, 106] and therefore could be less important compared to other environmental factors at a global scale.
The hourly net primary production (NP) rates (given as mg [O.sub.2] g [DW.sup.-1] [h.sup.-1]) were calculated from the differences in oxygen concentrations, measured over the incubation period (ca 1 h) (Paalme, 2005).
Above- and belowground net primary production: The amount of NPP varied depending upon vegetation type and density.
Above-ground net primary production in adjacent grassland and woodland on the coastal prairie of Texas, USA.
The soil amendments of the dredge spoil (acid sulphate) with poultry waste or red mangrove wood ash or a combination of both appeared to nullify the toxicity of the soil to Paspalum vaginatum and improved not only the vine length, net primary production and standing crop but also the health of the plant through conferement of tolerance to the abiotitic diseases of the plant.
Leaf area is generally positively correlated with aboveground net primary production (Fassnacht and Gower 1997), and leaf area of Douglas-fir stands increases in response to N fertilization (Brix 1983, Binkley and Reid 1984).
Most of the HI changes had already occurred before 1980, but increases in net primary production have also occurred since 1980, some of which are plant growth responses to increased atmospheric [CO.sub.2] (Rogers et al.
Net primary production will be determined for the herbaceous species through biomass sampling in May and again in September.
The growth response was defined for both the upland and lowland areas by correlating the Annual Moisture Deficit (AMD) with the Annual Net Primary Production (ANPP) per day of the growing season.