Inhibitor

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Related to Neuraminidase inhibitor: Oseltamivir, amantadine, Tamiflu, Zanamivir

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoffmann-La Roche (Roche) (Indianapolis, IN, USA), is the market leader of the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAI), the first class of antiviral drugs designed specifically to treat influenza.
In vitro generation of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance in A(H5N1) influenza viruses.
Susceptibility of virus isolates to the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), including oseltamivir and zanamivir and two investigative NAIs (peramivir and A-315675), was assessed by chemiluminescent neuraminidase inhibition assay using the NAStar Kit (Applied Biosystems, Foster City California) (4).
* Comment: Tamiflu is one of two available neuraminidase inhibitors, which work by blocking the influenza enzyme that promotes viral release from infected cells.
The limited effect of oseltamivir on reducing disease duration, usually only shortening the duration by 1 day in healthy persons (4), the possibility of serious side effects (5), the possibility of the virus developing resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors (6,7), and the cost to health care of unnecessary prescriptions are reasons to strive for better adherence to prescribing guidelines.
To reduce the burden of influenza in the United States, CDC continues to recommend a three-pronged approach: 1) influenza vaccination, 2) use of neuraminidase inhibitor antiviral medications when indicated for treatment or prevention, and 3) use of other measures to decrease the spread of influenza, including promotion of hand hygiene, respiratory hygiene, cough etiquette, and staying home from work and school when ill.
Two classes of antiviral medications are available currently: adamantanes or M2 ion channel inhibitors (i.e., amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (i.e., oseltamivir and zanamivir).
The adamantanes are ineffective against influenza B viruses, which limits the available antiviral options to 2 neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), inhaled zanamivir and oral oseltamivir.
But the virus appears sensitive to the neuraminidase inhibitor osehamivir (Tamiflu).
Nonetheless, the data show that people get better 1-2 days sooner with neuraminidase inhibitor treatment.
Amantadine and rimantadine are approved for treating influenza A, while the neuraminidase inhibitor drugs zanamivir and oseltamivir are approved to treat both influenza A and B [6-8].
-- Forget the fact that treating influenza with a neuraminidase inhibitor can reduce the duration of symptoms by 1-2 days.