neurapraxia


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Related to neurapraxia: axonotmesis, Neuropraxia

neurapraxia

[¦nu̇r·ə′prak·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Injury to a nerve in which there is localized degeneration of the myelin sheath with transient nerve block.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) Seddon Sunderland Structural and functional processes Neurapraxia 1 Myelin damage, conduction slowing, and blocking Axonotmesis 2 Loss of axonal continuity; endoneurium intact; no conduction Neurotmesis 3 Loss of axonal and endoneurial continuity; perineurium intact; no conduction 4 Loss of axonal, endoneurial, and perineurial continuity; epineurium intact; no conduction 5 Entire nerve trunk separated; no conduction
4% cerebrospinal fluid leakage, 2% transient neurapraxia, 2% permanent nerve root injury, 4-5% deep infection, and 312% hardware failure have been reported for the pedicle screw fixation technique [1,2].
In minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty Hozapfel et al (50) signaled the possibility of the maior nerves paralysis with mixed injuries of neurapraxia and structural damages (neurotmesis and assonotmesis).
(7) This increases the stress on the radiocapitellar joint and olecranon, and can lead to edema, scarring, calcification, osteophyte formation, medial epicondylitis, ulnar nerve neurapraxia, or radiocapitellar chondral damage.
Using a wide and padded tourniquet minimises the incidence of complications such as compression neurapraxia and temporary paresis (Dandy 1986, Wakai et al 2001, Oragui et al in press).
He diagnosed the arrestee with neurapraxia in both wrists, and a soft tissue sprain of the right wrist.
Neuromonitoring can detect stimulation of these nerves and thereby prevent a mechanical or thermal injury that can result in neurapraxia or axonotmesis.
People with this condition have a high risk of neurapraxia of the cervical spine, which presents as transient quadriplegia or quadriparesis.
Incidence of transient neurapraxia to any nerve was 1.5%, with one nerve injury and one tendon laceration.
The patient unfortunately did not recover shoulder abduction and forward elevation as an ENG assessed a complete neurapraxia of the axillary nerve (Figures 2(d)-2(f)).
Transient neurological deficit following cervical spine injury or cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN) has been described following sports injuries.