neurapraxia


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Related to neurapraxia: axonotmesis, Neuropraxia

neurapraxia

[¦nu̇r·ə′prak·sē·ə]
(medicine)
Injury to a nerve in which there is localized degeneration of the myelin sheath with transient nerve block.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Seddon Sunderland Structural and functional processes Neurapraxia 1 Myelin damage, conduction slowing, and blocking Axonotmesis 2 Loss of axonal continuity; endoneurium intact; no conduction Neurotmesis 3 Loss of axonal and endoneurial continuity; perineurium intact; no conduction 4 Loss of axonal, endoneurial, and perineurial continuity; epineurium intact; no conduction 5 Entire nerve trunk separated; no conduction
Surgical procedures of the hip and knee may be associated with neurapraxia (8).
People with this condition have a high risk of neurapraxia of the cervical spine, which presents as transient quadriplegia or quadriparesis.
Incidence of transient neurapraxia to any nerve was 1.
There were no instances of skin loss or necrosis, but neurapraxia lasting as long as 10 weeks and reperfusion pain were documented.
The patient unfortunately did not recover shoulder abduction and forward elevation as an ENG assessed a complete neurapraxia of the axillary nerve (Figures 2(d)-2(f)).
Transient neurological deficit following cervical spine injury or cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN) has been described following sports injuries.
We have identified four neurologic injuries; two mild transient distal brachial plexopathy issues that fully resolved by 12 weeks; one partial axillary neurapraxia that resolved by 6 weeks; one complete axillary neurapraxia that had significant motor weakness at 12 weeks, but completely resolved by 6 months.
Case 2 describes a patient with mild brachial plexus neurapraxia, which was most likely due to compression by shoulder braces (to prevent cephalad sliding during the Exaggerated head-down tilt.
In cases of neurapraxia or axonotmesis (even partial), some axons remain intact with their normal abductor or adductor function.