neurasthenic neurosis

neurasthenic neurosis

[‚nu̇r·əs′then·ik nu̇′rō·səs]
(psychology)
A neurotic disorder characterized by chronic complaints of easy fatigability, lack of energy, weakness, various aches and pains, and sometimes exhaustion. Also known as psychophysiologic nervous system reaction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
What do psychologists really mean when they speak of associative inhibitions, functional fixedness and neurasthenic neurosis? The language of science and technology, often flirting with outright jargon, is a daily reality for journalists.
DSM II kept the basic categorical list, though it now offered "Neurasthenic neurosis" replace what had been "Psychophysiologic nervous system reaction." DSM III interestingly retreated a bit, with a new offering, "Generalized Anxiety Disorder", though there was no bow to anything as plebeian as nervous breakdown and a note urged the common association with more precise disease entities, most notably depression.