neurobrucellosis

neurobrucellosis

[‚nu̇r·ō‚brü·sə′lō·səs]
(medicine)
Brucellosis with neurologic involvement, manifested by signs and symptoms of meningitis, encephalitis, radiculitis, or neuritis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Karsen et al reported that mean CSF ADA levels in tuberculous were 28.34 +- 14.83 IU/L, 8.71 +- 5.83 IU/L in neurobrucellosis, 6.18 +- 2.54 IU/L in purulent meningitis and 3.43 +- 3.48 U/L in aseptic meningitis, when cut off value of ADA levels were kept at 12.357.
We report a case of neurobrucellosis mimicking the symptoms, laboratory data, and the pathologic findings that can be seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), thus demonstrating the diagnostic challenges of such a heterogeneous disease.
The percentage frequency of final diagnosis in this group of patients was as follows: SAE (n = 61, 27%), bacterial meningitis (n = 27, 11.9%), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis of undetermined etiology (n = 27, 11.9%), neurotuberculosis (n = 20, 8.8%), toxic encephalopathy (n = 19, 8.4%), unidentified etiology (n = 16, 7.1%), herpes simplex encephalitis (n = 15, 6.6%), metabolic encephalopathy (n = 13, 5.8%), parameningeal infections/brain abscesses (n = 5, 4.2%), meningitis/encephalitis with other etiologies (n = 9, 4%), neurobrucellosis (n = 2, 2.9%), Varicella Zoster Virus encephalitis (n = 5, 2.5%), viral meningitis (n = 3, 1.3%), and others (n = 6, 2.7%).
Neurobrucellosis is a rare complication of brucellosis, a common zoonosis with multisystem involvement.
(4) Neurobrucellosis usually presents as meningoencephalitis.
Infected people show the symptoms of fever, arthralgia, myalgia, back pain, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, endocarditis, neurobrucellosis, epididymitis and orchitis (Dean et al., 2012; Godfroid et al., 2011; Olsen and Palmer, 2014).
Neurobrucellosis: unexpected answer from metagenomic next-generation sequencing.
Neurobrucellosis: unexpected answer from metagenomic next-generation sequencing [published online ahead of print January 6, 2017].
Brucellosis involving the central nervous system (CNS) is termed neurobrucellosis. The most common complications are meningitis and meningoencephalitis.
Nine years later, neurobrucellosis was first reported by Matthew Hughes [2].
Neurobrucellosis is a rare complication in childhood which can be detected in 2-7 percent of cases.