neuroethology


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neuroethology

[‚nu̇·rō·ē′thäl·ə·jē]
(zoology)
The study of the neural basis of animal behavior.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology 198:495-510.
Study leader Dr Geraldine Wright, Reader in Neuroethology at Newcastle University, explained that the effect of caffeine benefits both the honeybee and the plant: "Remembering floral traits is difficult for bees to perform at a fast pace as they fly from flower to flower and we have found that caffeine helps the bee remember where the flowers are.
Study leader Dr Geraldine Wright, Reader in Neuroethology at Newcastle University, UK, explained that the effect of caffeine benefits both the honeybee and the plant.
Study leader Dr Geraldine Wright, a reader in neuroethology at Newcastle University, said that the effect of caffeine benefits both the honeybee and the plant.
Journal of Comparative Physiology A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology 171:665-671.
of Newfoundland, Canada, supplies veterinarians, students of veterinary medicine and animal welfare, and animal care professionals with a guide to feline behavior and welfare that covers aspects of cat well-being, pedigree breeds and their characteristic domestic behavior, feline neuroethology, play and developmental stages, basic activities, association and reproduction, giant wild cats, principle and minor species of wild cats, common and comparative features of cats, abnormal behavior and training, health monitoring, and welfare guidelines.
Many such states, "especially acute states such as fear or anger, are coupled with enhanced perceptual processing, decision making, action selection, and increased energetic expenditure" (Katalin Gothard & Kari Hoffman, "Circuits of Emotion in the Primate Brain," in Primate Neuroethology, ed.
Effects of salidroside-pretreatment on neuroethology of rats after global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.
Twenty-three chapters are organized into sections on emerging research techniques, sensory systems, motor systems, learning and memory, behavior and neuroethology models, and evolution.
2) Yadin Dudai, "Properties of Learning and Memory in Drosophila melanogaster", Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology, 1976, 114: 69-89.