neuromast


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neuromast

[′nu̇r·ō‚mast]
(vertebrate zoology)
A lateral-line sensory organ in fishes and other lower vertebrates consisting of a cluster of receptor cells connected with nerve fibers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Within the sensory epithelium of a neuromast, the hair cells are oriented into two opposing directions that define the most sensitive axis of a neuromast (Flock & Wersall, 1962).
Supraorbital bar black, with distinctive narrow extension over the neuromast parietal series.
Estrogen receptor subtype 02 is involved in neuromast development in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae.
[86] Arrangement of anterior supraorbital neuromasts (Costa 2004d) (CI: 1.00; RI: 1.00): (0) continuous row; (1) posteriormost neuromast separated by space covered by scale.
Regeneration of Neuromast Hair Cells after Neomycin-Induced Hair Cell Damage.
Cephalic neuromasts: supraorbital 4 + 4, parietal 2, anterior rostral 1, posterior rostral 1, infraorbital 1 +1 + 1, preorbital 1, otic 1, postotic 1, preopercular 1, mandibular 2 or 4.
marmoratus (Poey), with which they share the presence of four neuromasts on the posterior supraorbital series, a long anterior nostril, and a bony laminar ventral process on the fifth ceratobranchial; K.
However, there is no information about neuromast in the larvae of these two species, except for the observation of small mechanoreceptor protuberances located along the sides of the body in larval anchoveta by Fischer (1958).
Cephalic neuromasts usually are readily visible in gobiids and eleotrids including Microphilypnus and Leptophilypnus and their pattern may be helpful in recognition of taxa and their classification.
Terminology for the cephalic neuromast series follows Scheel (1968) and Huber (2000) and for the frontal squamation Hoedeman (1958).
Mechanical filtering by the boundary layer and fluid-structure interaction in the superficial neuromast of the fish lateral line system.
Terminology for the cephalic neuromast series follows Scheel (1968), and that for the frontal squamation as described in Hoedeman (1958).