neuromast


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neuromast

[′nu̇r·ō‚mast]
(vertebrate zoology)
A lateral-line sensory organ in fishes and other lower vertebrates consisting of a cluster of receptor cells connected with nerve fibers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Frontal squamation nomenclature follows that described by Hoedeman (1958), and the cephalic neuromast series are described according to Costa (2006).
Although neuromast-specific responses to estrogens have not been reported in other biosensor fish, esr2a and esr2b are highly expressed in the neuromasts, and knockdown of esr2b abolishes neuromast development, indicating a crucial role of ER signaling for neuromast development/function (Froehlicher et al.
In most reported cases, cranial neuromasts form before trunk neuromasts and the first cranial neuromast to form is the otic neuromast located at the anterior edge of the otic vesicle.
However, a second type of neuromast, protected in canals below the skin surface, can ignore the chatter of rushing water and pick up more relevant vibrations, the researchers report in the Nov.
Terminology for frontal squamation follows Hoedeman (1958); the E- scale was determined as that scale adjacent to the anteriormost neuromast of the posterior section of the supraorbital series.
Terminology for frontal squamation and the cephalic neuromast series follow Hoedeman (1958) and Costa (2001), respectively.
Nomenclature for the neuromast system on the head follows Scheel (1968) and Huber (2000) and that for the frontal squamation follows Hoedeman (1958).
Leptophilypnus have the inframandibular main horizontal row of neuromast organs with numerous short vertical branches along all or part of its length.
Terminology for the cephalic neuromast series follows Scheel (1968) and Huber (2000) and for the frontal squamation Hoedeman (1958).
Mechanical filtering by the boundary layer and fluid-structure interaction in the superficial neuromast of the fish lateral line system.
Terminology for the cephalic neuromast series follows Scheel (1968), and that for the frontal squamation as described in Hoedeman (1958).