neuromast

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neuromast

[′nu̇r·ō‚mast]
(vertebrate zoology)
A lateral-line sensory organ in fishes and other lower vertebrates consisting of a cluster of receptor cells connected with nerve fibers.
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We also observed specific GFP expression in the neuromasts of the lateral line of the head and in ganglions adjacent to the otic vesicles and eyes, which showed typical large masses of neurons and neurite (see Figure 2Ci, Dii for responses to [E.
However, a group comprising all species of Rivulus except the subgenus Rivulus is well supported by morphology, their members having a uniquely derived pattern of arrangement of rostral neuromasts (i.
In rushing water, the neuromasts on a fish's skin get uselessly excited, say Horst Bleckmann and his colleagues at Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitat Bonn in Germany.
Neuromasts are mechanical receptors of anamniote aquatic vertebrates whose function is to detect vibrations in the surrounding water.
With an eye towards homeland defense needs, engineers have also noted that fish through neuromasts or 'hairs' in the lateral line are able to sense very small changes in their watery environment that allows them to detect and track prey and to form hydrodynamic images of the environment.
marmoratus (Poey), with which they share the presence of four neuromasts on the posterior supraorbital series, a long anterior nostril, and a bony laminar ventral process on the fifth ceratobranchial; K.
The 125-[micro]M dose resulted in expression in epithelial cells of the developing skin, gill, olfactory organ, digestive tract, liver, pronephric ducts of the pronephros, and in the lateral line neuromasts (Figure 3).
This is similar to the difference between superficial neuromasts and mechanosensors buried within the lateral line canal of fish (Coombs and Janssen, 1990).
Terminology for the arrangement of frontal scales follows Huber (1992), terminology for the cephalic neuromasts series follows Costa (2001).