neuromast

(redirected from neuromasts)
Also found in: Dictionary.

neuromast

[′nu̇r·ō‚mast]
(vertebrate zoology)
A lateral-line sensory organ in fishes and other lower vertebrates consisting of a cluster of receptor cells connected with nerve fibers.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Apparently, their function could be that of facilitating the water flow to the interior of the cephalic channels where the neuromasts are located, like a morphologic adaptation of the sensory system for orientation in the aquatic environment and for the reception of the hydrodynamic information produced by the host.
adloji species group through the possession of a long and triangular anal fin in females, two to four parietal neuromasts and the presence of a black ventral margin in the pectoral fins of males (except in A.
We also observed specific GFP expression in the neuromasts of the lateral line of the head and in ganglions adjacent to the otic vesicles and eyes, which showed typical large masses of neurons and neurite (see Figure 2Ci, Dii for responses to [E.sub.2] and BPA, respectively).
"It's not just that it describes a different quality of reality, but also that in place of just two eyes or ears this sense is fed by many discrete lateral-line organs, each of which in turn is composed of several neuromasts. The integration behind it is a tour de force," he added.
Its sensory line system is composed of short vertical canals containing single neuromasts, and of short U-shaped canals connecting pores of one skeletal element, or those of adjacent tesserae or scales.
The orienting response of lake Michigan mottled sculpin is mediated by canal neuromasts. J.
Distinguished from all other congeners by the possession of the following apomorphic features: hypurals completely fused to form a single plate (45.3), about 60% of the anterior portion of the caudal fin covered by scales (82.2), four neuromasts on the anterior supraorbital series (85.1), and a dark metallic blue humeral blotch in male.
Fish pick up water movements--like the kicks of an insect just right for lunch or the whoosh of an incoming predator--through sensory cells called neuromasts.
He even makes some speculative comments about the arrangement of "glandular disks" (free neuromasts) and lateral line canals in fishes with reduced eyes living in low-light environments.
A few animals had yellow-gold pigment associated with their lateral line neuromasts. Two animals had a brighter yellow ground color with sharply delineated borders between the ground color and the pigment spots.
Using the system, we investigated the hair cell damage and regeneration in the lateral line neuromasts of zebrafish larvae.