neuromuscular junction

(redirected from neuromuscular transmission)
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Related to neuromuscular transmission: neuromuscular junction

neuromuscular junction

[¦nu̇r·ō′məs·kyə·lər ′jəŋk·shən]
(anatomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
As a whole, data show that the blockage of presynaptic [A.sub.2A] adenosine receptors by ZM241385 contributes more to recover the blockage of neuromuscular transmission produced by a non-depolarizing muscular relaxants exhibiting inhibitory acetylcholinesterase activity in their molecules when the level of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft is not yet causing intense [M.sub.1]/[M.sub.2] muscarinic receptors activity on motor nerve terminal, i.e.
Neuromuscular transmission which was suppressed by tubocurarine in the in vitro preparation could be briefly restored by application to the nerve of two or more very closely spaced stimuli; this occurred because of summation of endplate potentials.
(1990) M wave changes with temperature in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and disorders of neuromuscular transmission. Muscle & Nerve 13, 613-617.
Clinical electrophysiological studies have demonstrated the impairment of neuromuscular transmission in CMS in vivo.
[Mg.sup.++] excess, although uncommon, is of special interest to the anesthetist; because it produces a curare-like effect on neuromuscular transmission.
Basic principles of neuromuscular transmission. Anaesthesia 2009;64 Suppl 1:1-9.
Only relatively clear cases of increased jitter should be considered as a diagnostic of disturbed neuromuscular transmission and borderline findings should be interpreted with caution (13).
Exclusion criteria were: Presence of neuromuscular disorders; patients with hepatic and renal diseases; body mass >30% of the ideal body weight; anticipated difficult ventilation or endotracheal intubation; patients receiving drugs known to interfere with neuromuscular transmission.
Transient neonatal myasthenia gravis (MG) is a postsynaptic neuromuscular transmission disorder, and it is observed in 10%-15% of the babies born to mothers with MG.
The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists guidelines in relation to Neuromuscular Transmission Monitoring (Professional Standard 18, 3.10, 2008) recommend that a neuromuscular function monitor be available for every patient in whom neuromuscular blockade is used.