neurotic personality


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neurotic personality

[nə′räd·ik ‚pər·sə′nal·əd·ē]
(psychology)
An individual who exhibits symptoms or manifestations intermediate between normal character traits and true neurotic features.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is in agreement with the present results and at the same time asserts that patients with cardiac diseases have neurotic personality traits.
Prior researchers have found that neurotic personality characteristics are closely related to negative emotions after a disaster (Lawrence, Fauerbach, Heinberg, & Doctor, 2004; O'Toole, Marshall, Schureck, & Dobson, 1998).
Since neurotic personality is characterized by moodiness, worry, anxiety and anger, individuals high on neuroticism may not be able to understand the other person's perspective and thus less likely to oblige, integrate or compromise in stressful situation of conflict (Annalakshmi, 2007)
Influenced by the environmentalist social science of the day, theorists such as Karen Horney (1937) in The Neurotic Personality of Our Time began to examine how culture shaped personality (Gilkeson, 2010).
Patients can be genetically more likely to develop neurotic personality traits, while severe illness or abuse during childhood can erode perceptions of control in adulthood, he said.
The lead author recommended further studies to find out if interventions such as medications or lifestyle changes could lower AD risk in people with neurotic personality styles.
Men with neurotic personality traits are having fewer children compared to previous generations, according to the study.
Moreover, given that individuals with greater levels of neuroticism may be more aware of death, addressing existential concerns may come to be an important focus of treatment for individuals with higher levels of neurotic personality traits.
In addition, the centenarians had lower scores for displaying neurotic personality and higher scores for being conscientious compared with a representative sample of the U.
There is the inherent drama of the subject itself, and there is the best thing about the book, which is the concentration on the neurotic personality of Phil Hill(1927-2008) and his many accomplishments in motor sports, business, and connoisseurship.
The "anxious" group had a low actual fall risk but viewed it as high, and were more likely to fall than non-anxious people with a similar fall risk--something the researchers attributed to neurotic personality traits, symptoms of depression and poor physical functioning.
Among mothers--but not fathers--depression, neurotic personality disorder and nonpsychotic disorders were also associated with increased risk of children being diagnosed with autism.