neuroticism


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neuroticism

[nə′räd·ə‚siz·əm]
(psychology)
A neurotic condition, character, or trait.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 1: Neuroticism as a moderator of the relationship between pain intensity and Physical Functioning.
Furthermore, t-test revealed significant gender differences in self-esteem and neuroticism. Moderation analysis was also performed revealing openness to experience as moderator between neuroticism and self-esteem.
Such that the relationship between the two constructs will be stronger under high rather than low neuroticism.
The current study found that people with low emotional stability (high neuroticism) had increased rates of schizophrenia and other nonaffective psychosis, and that neuroticism is linked with increased rates of bipolar and schizoaffective disorder.
Their results revealed that subjects in cluster II scored significantly higher on neuroticism and lower on extraversion, agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness than those in cluster I.
Neuroticism and agreeableness are the strongest and most consistent personality predictors of relationship outcomesincluding relationship dissatisfaction, conflict, abuseand ultimately dissolution (Karney&Brabury, 1995).
Kong et al .[sup][3] have demonstrated that PACG patients tend to have significantly higher neuroticism scores and higher level of anxiety and depression compared with normal controls.
Previous studies into the link between neuroticism and physical health have had mixed results, but it might be surprising that worry could have a positive effect on health given the established link between anxiety disorders and physical health conditions - the chronic worry and other negative feelings neurotic people experience are similar to some symptoms of an anxiety disorder.
Much of this research has been influenced by Eysenck's biological theory of personality (Eysenck, 1967), which proposes primary dimensions of extraversion, neuroticism and psychoticism, each associated with a distinct neurobiological system or pathway (reward, avoidance, and aggression/fight-or-flight, respectively).
Neuroticism is related to uncontrol anger, low self-esteem and high anxiety.
The study showed people, who are more emotionally stable, spend more over the holidays while those high in neuroticism spend less over the same time period.
Neuroticism is a predisposition to negative affect or emotional instability and is one of the Big Five personality traits that has been linked to stress and other mental health concerns (see, e.g., Costa & McCrae, 1980; Hayes & Joseph, 2003).