neuroticism


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neuroticism

[nə′räd·ə‚siz·əm]
(psychology)
A neurotic condition, character, or trait.
References in periodicals archive ?
18th percentile in Neuroticism ("probably remain calm, even in tense situations").
H2: The participants in the moderate-crimes group will have significantly lower rates of neuroticism, alcohol consumption, and illicit drug use as well as significantly higher rates of contentiousness and agreeableness compared to the participants in the substantial-crimes group.
The Big Five traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience) were found to create significant impact on job performance, academic achievement, leadership and well-being (John, Srivastava, 1999; Heckman, et al.
In present research, the reliability of 5 subscales including conscientious sense, neuroticism, extraversion, amiability, and flexibility were obtained 91%, 88%91%, 80% and 78% respectively using Cronbach's alpha.
Specifically, we sought to investigate the relationship using varied measures of disgust sensitivity within a more diverse subclinical sample while simultaneously controlling for the possibly confounding effect of neuroticism.
Neuroticism is characterized by negative emotions, such as anxiety and low self-esteem.
The Revised Neuroticism, Extroversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory (NEOFFI-3) was used to assess the personality traits of neuroticism, conscientiousness, and openness to experience.
According to Chowdury (2008) openness and neuroticism, were stronger predictors of academic success; however research of O'Connor and Paunonen (2007) as well as Busato et al.
Research suggests that people who are rated as high in neuroticism are also high in public self-consciousness and particularly likely to report feeling embarrassed in social situations in general (Lopes, Salovey, & Straus, 2003).
The Ocean acronym stands for Openness to experience, Conscientiousness, Extroversion/Introversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism or emotional stability.
With regard to personality factors, counselors with less neuroticism and higher extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness experienced greater personal accomplishment and less depersonalization and emotional exhaustion.
The five key dimensions of personality are known as Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to experience, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness which represent the basic dimensions underlying personality (Costa & McCrae 1991; Digman 1990).