neurotoxin

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neurotoxin

[¦nu̇r·ō′täk·sən]
(biochemistry)
A poisonous substance in snake venom that acts as a nervous system depressant by blocking neuromuscular transmission by binding acetylcholine receptors on motor end plates, or on the innervated face of an electroplax.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, venoms are described as either neurotoxic or hematotoxic.
Adolescents, whose brains are still at the stage of further enhancement are more vulnerable to neurotoxic effects.
Cobras, Wide Potently neurotoxic rinkhals, distribution and cytotoxic; mambas, throughout common cause of coral, Africa fatal snake bite shield, nose, garter and sea snake Neurotoxic cobras (genus Naja) Naja anchietae Anchieta's Arid savanna: Potently neurotoxic; Egyptian Namibia, see below as for N.
Paraquat is an herbicide that has neurotoxic effects that resemble Parkinson's disease.
These sources of prenatal and postnatal ethylmercury exposure should be considered significant sources of an additional neurotoxic coexposure--organic mercury.
Some local anaesthetics have prominent neurotoxic effects and could not provide selective spinal analgesia (2).
Bad as the neurotoxic effect might be, Baden's team unveiled at the meeting three new mechanisms of brevetoxin poisoning--detrimental changes in lung function, immunity, and DNA.
Some studies have suggested that because seniors are at increased risk of cognitive decline, they might be more susceptible to the neurotoxic effects of mercury.
* Emphasize the most important issues: The protection of unborn babies and small children from exposure to the neurotoxic mercury.
An unexpected increase in neurotoxicity has been a particular concern, so a less neurotoxic platinum agent, carboplatin, is being investigated as an alternative to cisplatin by the AGO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynakologische Onkologie) study group.
The Monsanto Corporation, makers of Roundup, claims there is no evidence that glyphosate "causes carcinogenity, birth defects, neurotoxic effects or mutagenic effects."
Key secondary and exploratory endpoints evaluated reductions in neurotoxic heme intermediates, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen, usage of hemin, symptoms of AHP, such as pain, nausea, and fatigue, as well as impact on quality of life.