neurotoxicity


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Related to neurotoxicity: Glutamate neurotoxicity

neurotoxicity

[‚nu̇·ro·täk′sis·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Adverse effects on the structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system caused by exposure to a toxic chemical, symptoms include muscle weakness, loss of sensation and motor control, tremors, cognitive alterations, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the researchers examined the mice's brains, they found significantly smaller deposits of toxic proteins in the brains of the supplemented animals indicative of protection against neurotoxicity. (4)
In previous CGC neurotoxicity studies, neuronal death was shown to arise from several reasons, such as excess glutamate release, changes in [Ca.sup.2+] homeostasis, deficiency of [K.sup.+], reactive oxygen species production, and caspase activation [8, 12].
However, it was associated with bone marrow suppression and late onset neurotoxicity especially in elderly population.6
In some patients who experienced extreme neurotoxicity, the scientists found, the blood-brain barrier, which protects the brain from potentially dangerous substances circulating in the blood, had broken down.
From this case report, we highlight the excellent response of methylprednisolone on high-dose cytarabine cerebellar toxicity that suggests an immune-mediated mechanism of neurotoxicity.
In fact, over 85 percent of cases of valacyclovir or acyclovir neurotoxicity are associated with varying degrees of renal impairment, including dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease [2].
The pathophysiology for the development of neurotoxicity from intrathecal nonionic contrast injections is not well understood but has been linked to osmolarity disturbances [15], lipid solubility [16], or even direct toxicity [17] of these agents.
Although chemotherapy is one of the most effective strategies for the treatment of cancer, however the used drugs often causes several adverse effects such as cardiotoxicity, ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, thereby limiting its clinical application (Li et al., 2006; Kwatra et al., 2016).
These findings indicate that a significant decrease in the levels of MT and T can lead to OB neurotoxicity in rats.
Regarding non-cancer health hazards, EPA will evaluate acute toxicity, liver toxicity, thyroid toxicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, sensitization, and irritation.
Increase in the relative spectral power due to anesthesia effects (Zoletil) in a model of aluminium neurotoxicity in the delta range is an indicator of neurotoxicity and compared to the group of anesthetized rats (dominant delta range), it differs in the cerebrum and cerebellum.