neurotoxicity


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Related to neurotoxicity: Glutamate neurotoxicity

neurotoxicity

[‚nu̇·ro·täk′sis·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Adverse effects on the structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system caused by exposure to a toxic chemical, symptoms include muscle weakness, loss of sensation and motor control, tremors, cognitive alterations, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the persistence of our patient's ototoxicity supports the contention that even though the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of acute and persistent neurotoxicity may differ, a linkage between them may exist.
CSA with ropivacaine has the potential to be used for postoperative analgesia, but potential neurotoxicity in the context of continuous infusion is unknown.
OXIGON(TM) is considerably more potent than melatonin in blocking beta-amyloid neurotoxicity and offers several other pharmacological advantages.
Physicians should be aware of the possibility of baclofen-induced neurotoxicity in patients with CRF.
2) In our and others' experience, imaging techniques can occasionally pick up abnormalities caused by neurotoxicity and may be helpful for forensic purposes, but they are not cost-beneficial for routine screening.
These factors exacerbate Hg's neurotoxicity and conspire to intensify its pathologic effects in brain and endocrine tissues.
In other controlled research, conducted mostly on women with breast cancer, combination chemotherapy with methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, and 5-fluorouracil has been most frequently associated with cognitive problems, although neurotoxicity has also been reported with other commonly used cancer drugs.
Used as a cold, high level disinfectant for hospital equipment, glutaraldehyde has been shown to cause or irritate a range of skin and respiratory conditions, including neurotoxicity.
A year later, the FDA, CDC and National Institutes of Health issued a joint statement with the American Academy of Pediatrics that urged vaccine manufacturers to stop using thimerosal because of a "theoretical potential for neurotoxicity.
Overlapping neurotoxicity between agents such as stavudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, and paclitaxel can at times become problematic, but in general, neurotoxicity is relatively mild in the short run and usually reversible when paclitaxel is suspended.
Doctors don't typically give the drug to someone more than 3 hours after a stroke because risks of damage, whether from neurotoxicity or bleeding in the brain, outweigh the benefits.