neurotoxin


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neurotoxin

[¦nu̇r·ō′täk·sən]
(biochemistry)
A poisonous substance in snake venom that acts as a nervous system depressant by blocking neuromuscular transmission by binding acetylcholine receptors on motor end plates, or on the innervated face of an electroplax.
References in periodicals archive ?
"With the medical aesthetics market vastly expanding, a fast-acting neurotoxin with a 2 to 4-week duration will be an attractive option for consumers, particularly those who are considering a medical aesthetics treatment for the first time "
The active ingredient in both programmes, EB-001, is a novel botulinum neurotoxin serotype E (BoNT/E) with a unique clinical profile, characterised by a rapid onset of action within 24 hours and a 2 to 4-week duration of effect.
The neurotoxin, called acrolein, is produced within the body after nerve cells are damaged, increasing pain and triggering a cascade of biochemical events thought to worsen the injury's severity.
Cobra venom contains a post synaptic a neurotoxins called as cobrotoxin which consist of 60-62 or 66-74 amino acids.
where R denotes the residue of neurotoxin P and the subscript L is the number of residues of the neurotoxin P.
Staging may not always be possible, but he prefers to allow 2 weeks for a neurotoxin to take effect before adding more neurotoxin or filler.
In vitro potency determination of botulinum neurotoxin B based on its receptor-binding and proteolytic characteristics.
A new study from researchers in Australia has found Antarctica's sea ice to contain toxic levels of a potent neurotoxin called methylmercury.
However, little has been known about potential effects of regularly eating seafood contaminated with mercury, a neurotoxin that can disrupt the transmission of signals between neurons (brain cells).
--Kenneth Coale of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories near Monterey, California, on recent research revealing the journey of a neurotoxin that is carried by fog from the ocean to land in the San Francisco region, eventually finding its way into area wildlife.
Last year, an article (2) by world renowned neurodevelopmental toxicologists Philippe Grandjean and Philip Landrigan published in the prestigious medical journal, The Lancet, classified fluoride as a neurotoxin like other known neurotoxins such as lead and mercury.