neutral atmosphere

neutral atmosphere

[′nü·trəl ′at·mə‚sfir]
(engineering)
An atmosphere which neither oxidizes nor reduces immersed materials.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nominal oven temperature will be at least 1600 A C, it can operate under high vacuum and neutral atmosphere and / or reactive and present a useful volume greater than 50l (ideally 100l).
The ring rain's effect occurs in Saturn's ionosphere (Earth has a similar ionosphere), where charged particles are produced when the otherwise neutral atmosphere is exposed to a flow of energetic particles or solar radiation.
Electrostatic waves generated by the HAARP radio transmissions are thought to be responsible for accelerating electrons to high enough energy to produce the glow discharge in the neutral atmosphere approaching altitudes of nearly170 kilometers.
A neutral atmosphere produces the greatest temperature rise while expending the least amount of fuel.
He limits the discussion to the unguided propagation of microwaves in the neutral atmosphere, particularly for the purpose of characterizing and modeling atmospheric constituents, or remote sensing.
The bonded, sand specimens were heated in a muffle furnace using a neutral atmosphere consisting of a 7 to 1 ratio of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.
In a neutral atmosphere where conversation is the main activity, individual views open themselves up to collective response, debate and challenge.
If neutral atmosphere furnaces are not available, parts are sometimes wrapped in stainless foil to minimize oxygen exposure.
The opposition parties are concerned about their personal safety in Cambodia, saying the CPP has not ensured their safety nor provided a neutral atmosphere for a meeting in Cambodia.
In the current circumstance, I understand that any meeting in the Kingdom of Cambodia cannot guarantee safety and a neutral atmosphere,'' Prince Ranariddh says in the letter.
The roughly spherical device carries five scientific instruments: Italy's contribution is a Neutral Atmosphere Density or "drag balance" experiment, designed to measure drag forces on the satellite.
Offering global observations that yield near real-time altitude profiles of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere over an extended period of time, SSULI makes measurements from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to the far ultraviolet (FUV) over the wavelength range of 80 nanometers (nm) to 170 nm with 2.