neutral mutation


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neutral mutation

[′nü·trəl myü‚tā·shən]
(genetics)
A mutation that has no phenotypic effect or adaptive significance.
References in periodicals archive ?
However the SNP of G116C did not affect cashmere traits and was a neutral mutation.
Statistical method for testing the neutral mutation hypothesis by DNA polymorphism.
In one approach, the variance method described by Hudson (1987), C was estimated as a function of (1) the variance ([Mathematical Expression Omitted]) in the number of restriction-site differences between pairs of gene sequences and (2) the neutral mutation parameter [theta](= 2NI1, where 11 is the neutral mutation rate for the gene segment, per genome per generation; thus, for a segment with [kappa] sites assayed by restriction [see Appendix 1], [mu] is [kappa] times the rate of neutral mutation per nucleotide site, [[mu].
Populations instead reach an equilibrium level of sequence divergence, at which the diversifying effect of neutral mutation is balanced by the homogenizing effect of interpopulation recombination.
In Takahata's fluctuating neutral space model, for example, the neutral mutation rate is changed with each neutral substitution.
Selection should affect eye-antennal correlations only while neutral mutation could affect all correlations.
As originally conceived (Kimura, 1968), the neutral theory proposes that a diploid population of size N with a neutral mutation rate u produces mutations at a rate 2Nu.
These neutral mutations are the ones that scientists compare to trace human ancestry.
The second category, nonpathogenic or benign polymorphisms, includes sequence variants that have been previously identified as neutral mutations.
Note also that the linear tissue design does not change the rate of accumulation of neutral mutations.
Interesting facts are scattered throughout the book, such as how scientists determine the diets of fossilized organisms, how the molecular clock of neutral mutations can determine the time elapsed since a split from common ancestors, the evolution of complex adaptations (venom before fangs, and probably before snakes), the development of feathers from genes that originally produced scales, and the evolution of the complex eye, to name a few examples.