neutralize

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Related to neutralisation: titration

neutralize

[′nü·trə‚līz]
(chemistry)
To make a solution neutral (neither acidic nor basic, pH of 7) by adding a base to an acidic solution, or an acid to a basic solution.
(electronics)
To nullify oscillation-producing voltage feedback from the output to the input of an amplifier through tube interelectrode capacitances; an external feedback path is used to produce at the input a voltage that is equal in magnitude but opposite in phase to that fed back through the interelectrode capacitance.
(optics)
To place a lens in contact with other lenses of equal and opposite power so that the combination has zero power.
(ordnance)
To destroy or reduce the effectiveness of enemy personnel and materiel by gunfire, bombing, or any other means.
To make a toxic chemical agent harmless by chemical action.
To disarm or otherwise render safe a mine, bomb, missile, or booby trap.

neutralize

To render an enemy force, installation, action, operation, or the like ineffective by military action. It does not necessarily involve destruction, as an airfield may be neutralized for a short period of time by cratering the runways.
References in periodicals archive ?
While central banks in other parts of the developing world display no independence, those in Pacific Asia exhibit relatively high independence with summed neutralisation coefficients of -0.
Quite predictably, central banks in low-inflation countries are more independent with summed neutralisation coefficients of -0.
Finally, the central banks in the ten countries with highest economic growth post the largest summed neutralisation coefficients of -0.
Given the neutralisation coefficients presented in Table 4, however, one might wonder whether these results are detecting competence rather than independence.
I turn now to the sterilisation coefficients estimated in the same sets of equations as the neutralisation coefficients.
211 are relatively small compared with the corresponding neutralisation coefficients of -0.
As with the estimated neutralisation coefficients, the largest behavioural differences between groups of central banks' sterilisation coefficients appear in Table 7 where the country selection is based on location, inflation, and growth.
677 are consistently smaller than the corresponding neutralisation coefficients of -0.
Had the estimates presented in this paper indicated that fiscal characteristics alone differentiated neutralisation behaviour and that neutralisation behaviour differed from sterilisation behaviour, one might have concluded that a country's fiscal characteristics determined the independence of its central bank.
While the location attribute is virtually subsumed in the growth attribute (four of the five Pacific Asian countries are included in the high-growth group) and the inflation attribute is closely related to fiscal characteristics, the growth attribute differentiates central bank neutralisation behaviour better than any other attribute.
Given that the estimated sterilisation coefficients provide an extraordinarily similar picture to the estimated neutralisation coefficients, does neutralisation indicate independence or competence?