neutron scattering


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neutron scattering

[′nü‚trän ‚skad·ə·riŋ]
(nucleonics)
The change in direction of neutrons caused by collision with nuclei in a material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fernandez-Baca, a distinguished research staff member in the Quantum Condensed Matter Division in ORNL's Neutron Science Directorate, was recognized by the APS Division of Materials Physics for seminal neutron scattering studies of magnetic materials, especially the spin and lattice dynamics of colossal magnetoresistive manganites.
Numerous studies has been made concerning the morphology and its spatial distribution of proton exchange membrane through small angel neutron scattering (SANS) and small angel X-ray scattering (SAXS).
The researchers showed used neutron scattering techniques at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) to investigate the arrangement of these clusters and showed that hydrophobic amphiphiles could still assemble into extended structures in much the same way as conventional amphiphiles.
The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique has proven valuable for the characterization of structures in the nanometer size scale.
Kartini summed up the proceedings of the event in her concluding remarks prior to the certificate distribution ceremony which was followed by a tour of the nuclear reactor based at BATAN's facilities in Serpong, as well as a visit to the Neutron Scattering Laboratory within the same premises.
The experiments were conducted at the NIST Center for Neutron Research on the perfect crystal diffractometer for ultra-high resolution small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) measurements.
This reference for high-pressure scientists and engineers describes techniques for neutron scattering beyond 10 GPa, with an emphasis on methods which have became available since the early 1990s.
Enter neutron crystallography - the use of neutron scattering to paint a picture of these bonds.
The scientists at ILL used a technique called neutron scattering to confirm that it was this clumping of the iron-rich surfactant that brought about its magnetic properties.
Scientists at ILL used a technique called "small angle neutron scattering (SANS)" to confirm that it was this clumping of the iron-rich surfactant that brought about its magnetic properties.
Furthermore, scattering methods such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are well suited to study these particles in dispersion.
ITER Project Office in Oak Ridge consulted with scientists at SNS about using neutron scattering to examine the states of materials inside the cables.