new town


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

new town

(in Britain) a town that has been planned as a complete unit and built with government sponsorship, esp to accommodate overspill population

new town

A new, essentially self-sufficient city, built in a previously undeveloped area, which provides residential, commercial, industrial, educational, recreational, and public facilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those who want to go towards Civic Centre via New town route, they are advised to take u-turn, while moving from University road, nearby Expo Centre to reach their respective destinations, said Traffic police spokesman Saeed Arain.
The 33 New Towns developed since 1946 represent the most sustained programme of new town development undertaken anywhere in the world.
The pictures were all taken between the 1960s to the 80s, and follow on from a recent feature on the New Town which sparked lots of interest from readers.
The company was opening a new factory at the New Town which was being established beside Cramlington village.
But I prefer the flyover as there are plans for other projects on land that is yet to be reclaimed behind the new town and it will help a lot in future.
New town of Hashtgerd is located 65 kilometers west of Tehran city, and 25 kilometers west of Karaj city.
Plaid Cymru and others maintain that only 5,600 houses need to be built in that period, while Barry and Vale Friends of the Earth say that many of those could be built as the new town.
Now a new study from Lloyds TSB has shown housing affordability in Newtown and its fellow Welsh new town Cwmbran, near Newport, is at its best level in five years.
Thus, beginning in early October with a three-unit row house, New Town Builders has been framing all its houses about 20 so far - with beetle-kill timber harvested from Colorado forests and milled into 2 x 4 and 2 x 6 framing studs at Intermountain Resources in Montrose.
As envisioned, New Town at Capital City Market will include 3.
In fact, the Row was named in the late eighteenth century because it linked the older built-up part of Birmingham with a new town that was emerging between the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal and the Aston Brook.