newsletter


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newsletter

History a written or printed account of the news
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

newsletter

(publication)
A periodically published work containing news and announcements on some subject, typically with a small circulation. Newsletters are a common application for DTP and may be distributed by electronic mail.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
3) The newsletter should be up to date: There is nothing like an outdated newsletter to make employees feel like this is all just an exercise in futility.
Under the editorship of Marina Douglas, the newsletter underwent several makeovers.
+ Editorial categories (new this year) recognize journalism excellence in subscription (b-to-b and consumer) newsletters; corporate (internal and external); organization, association, website, free e-zine, and supplement/annual/special report.
"The difference between what we offer on our radio reports, Hays says, "and what we offer on the e-mail newsletter is that we can impart more details about stories to our e-mail audience than we have time to do so on the radio.
Since the inception of J@pan Inc, the magazine's bevy of weekly e-mail newsletters has tackled these sorts of "big picture" issues--the fragile health of the Japanese economy being a recurring favorite--and has offered the nuanced analysis often missing from blanket accounts of a Japan paralyzed by economic woes.
* The newsletter can now become interactive, with links to mentioned items and reader polling to get instant feedback.
A biweekly electronic newsletter from the experts at TAPPI's PLACE Division.
In addition to links to online software stores, Tucows.com offers flee newsletters and financial and technology articles
All your marketing efforts -- from advertising to in-store demos -- must reflect your company's vision and the newsletter is no exception.
The average company newsletter probably isn't going to attract more than 1,500 to 2,000 subscribers a week--unless you've got a highly trafficked site or are having a contest.
* Use a newsletter as the direct mail vehicle, as opposed to a letter, postcard, or brochure.
Apple Computer's public relations department publishes in-house a fax newsletter, 4 1/2 Weeks, which is about how often it comes out.