newsprint


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newsprint

[′nüz‚print]
(materials)
The paper used in the publication of newspapers; an impermanent material made from mechanical wood pulp, with some chemical wood pulp.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was after the Commission found that the "domestic newsprint industry suffered serious injury from 2012 to September 2014" given the "abrupt and notably sharp increase in the volume of newsprint imported into the Philippines particularly in 2012.
1 million ($US245 million), with newsprint sales up 13.
The closure plans were initially announced on 22 April 2010 and since then the situation has remained unchanged -- there is still oversupply in the European newsprint and directory paper market, which has pulled down sales prices.
25 research note that newsprint market conditions improved marginally as the PPPC figures show a decelerated rate of consumption decline in July compared to previous months.
Corporate management in Norske Skog has decided curtailments of 200,000 tonnes European newsprint production in 2008.
SP is the second-largest producer of 100 percent recycled newsprint and North America's fifth-largest newsprint producer.
UPM followed suit, noting that demand for standard and improved newsprint was higher and prices for standard newsprint averaged 4% higher in Europe in 2005.
To increase the opportunities for such intimacy, preservation chemists such as Tumosa and his colleagues have recently begun to piece together a new picture of how newsprint ages.
CPR officials state it is the only car on the market that can load 50-inch newsprint rolls to the car's full pay-load capacity.
Demand for newsprint is also strong on the domestic market as the price of imported product soared with the rupiah fall in 1998.
The newsprint industry is in the midst of a price increase, with increases of about 7 percent to about $515 a ton since mid-1999, the Journal reported.
Newspapers this year are enjoying the best of all possible worlds for making profits--reasonably strong advertising performance and rapidly falling newsprint prices.