next-generation telescope

next-generation telescope

Any telescope, under development, under construction, or in operation, with design features that make use of the most recent technology. The next-generation optical telescopes are giant reflectors with apertures exceeding 6 meters. Their features include lightweight monolithic or segmented primary mirrors, active optics, adaptive optics, computer control of the telescope, optics, and the attached instrumentation, and remote operation. Certain new technologies are being installed on older existing telescopes.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone has a part to play, and everyone has to know their lines." Webb is the next-generation telescope that has been in planning since Hubble's earliest days in space more than 25 years ago.
Equipped with this kind of next-generation telescope, astronomers will delve into questions about the formation of the first galaxies and the nature of dark energy and dark matter.
This month's story describes the three next-generation telescopes that are planned for the 2020s; next month's article will focus on instrumentation and science.
However, researchers said that some amount of oxygen might linger, and if that really happens, next-generation telescopes like the Giant Magellan Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope may be able to detect and analyze it.
Debes notes that the Hubble photos were taken by an instrument installed in 1997; he is confident that next-generation telescopes will see the planet if it exists.
The achievement also provides new opportunities for testing competing theories of modern cosmology against breakthrough observations expected from next-generation telescopes.
The chance alignment of the Lynx arc, the galaxy cluster, and Earth "is offering us insight into what the next-generation telescopes are going to provide routinely, namely, glimpses of some of the first star-forming places in the universe," says Stephen E.
Astronomers have determined that next-generation telescopes become most scientifically justified at twice or more their previous size.
The committee, chaired by Roger Blandford (Stanford University), has spent the past year reviewing the costs and scientific productivity of current observatories and consulting with the community to see how assets can be freed for next-generation telescopes. On November 3, 2006, the Senior Review released its report, which is available at www.nsf.gov/mps/ ast/seniorreview/sr-report.pdf.

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