niche


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niche:

see ecologyecology,
study of the relationships of organisms to their physical environment and to one another. The study of an individual organism or a single species is termed autecology; the study of groups of organisms is called synecology.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Niche

A recess in a wall; usually semicircular at the back, terminating in a half-dome, or with small pediments supported on consoles, often used as a place for a statue.

angle niche

A niche formed at a corner of a building; common in medieval architecture.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Niche

 

(1) In architecture, a recess in a wall for a statue, a vase, built-in shelves, and similar objects. Niches are sometimes used to impart a sculptural quality to a wall.

(2) In geomorphology, a niche, or crater, is a cavity in the lower part of a protruding abrasion shoreline. It occurs as a result of wave erosion. As the niche becomes deeper, the weight of the bench of bedrock hanging over it increases. The bench finally breaks off and a cliff, an overhanging scarp, forms.

(3) In military science, a niche is a recess in the wall of a trench or communications passage. It is used to store ammunition and water and serves as protection from bullets, shell fragments, and mortar fire. It is also a shelter during bad weather. In loose soils, the walls and ceiling of the niche are faced with boards or any available material.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

niche

[nich]
(ecology)
The unique role or way of life of a plant or animal species.
(geology)
A shallow cave or reentrant produced by weathering and erosion near the base of a rock face or cliff or beneath a waterfall.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

niche

A recess in a wall, usually to contain sculpture or an urn; often semicircular in plan, surmounted by a half dome.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

niche

1. a recess in a wall, esp one that contains a statue
2. any similar recess, such as one in a rock face
3. Commerce relating to or aimed at a small specialized group or market
4. Ecology the role of a plant or animal within its community and habitat, which determines its activities, relationships with other organisms, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The study found that 23.6 percent of species in the study will be outside their fundamental niches under the IPCC's most extreme climate scenario, which Sax points out is also the most likely scenario given our current carbon emission levels.
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Having passion or love for a certain industry or segment is vital because you will be spending most of your time understanding, serving, and working directly inside this niche.
Nadig of ETF.com recommends that advisors interested in niche ETFs know the composition of the fund and why they want to own it, as they would any other investment.
These were combined to one variable ('distance to roads') as they were highly correlated in the ecological niche space, and as the results did not differ qualitatively compared to the results of including private and public roads as two separate variables.
These examples of letting the niche find the advisor are very different from the usual advice to pick a niche with which an advisor has no previous connection.
To that end, Niche Brands perfumes are produced with the world's finest natural oils sourced from around the globe to ensure beauty and quality.
A niche practice comes about from building expertise in a distinct area of law or industry segment.