nickname


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nickname

(1) An alternate name used to identify yourself in a chat room.

(2) A shortcut for identifying a recipient in an e-mail address book.
References in classic literature ?
And in a moment he had accosted the man by the boy's nickname, obviously without thinking of an affront which few would have read in that hearty open face and hand.
He has got his nickname because he is the most unpopular man in his ship.
His business was that of discounting commercial paper in the quartier Saint-Martin, where he was known by the nickname of "Gigonnet," from the nervous convulsive movement with which he lifted his legs in walking, like a cat.
Clam was Nelson's partner, and he was a fine, brave, handsome, moustached man of thirty--everything, in short, that his nickname did not connote.
He was brave, and even if his snobbishness earned for him the nickname of the "Old English Baron," his comrades admired his spirit, and in the end, instead of being unpopular, he led-- often to mischief.
Browning's childhood nickname, 'The Little Portuguese'), which is one of the finest of English sonnet-sequences.
There is a battle and they gain the day, and then modesty, which they call silliness, is ignominiously thrust into exile by them, and temperance, which they nickname unmanliness, is trampled in the mire and cast forth; they persuade men that moderation and orderly expenditure are vulgarity and meanness, and so, by the help of a rabble of evil appetites, they drive them beyond the border.
I had hired the boat in company with a friend of mine, formerly notorious in London society, under the nickname (derived from the peculiar brown color of his whiskers) of 'Mahogany Dobbs.
Scud was East's nickname, or Black, as we called it, gained by his fleetness of foot.
He seemed to have taken his head --round as a bullet--out of a box of marbles, and it is from that, I think, that his comrades of the press--all determined billiard-players--had given him that nickname, which was to stick to him and be made illustrious by him.
Zarathustra's habit of designating a whole class of men or a whole school of thought by a single fitting nickname may perhaps lead to a little confusion at first; but, as a rule, when the general drift of his arguments is grasped, it requires but a slight effort of the imagination to discover whom he is referring to.
In consequence of Dobbin's victory, his character rose prodigiously in the estimation of all his schoolfellows, and the name of Figs, which had been a byword of reproach, became as respectable and popular a nickname as any other in use in the school.