Night Heron

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Night Heron

 

(Nycticorax nycticorax ), a bird of the family Ardeidae (herons and bitterns), order Ciconiiformes. The body is 60 cm long. The color of the plumage is mainly black (with a metallic sheen), whitish, and gray. The night heron is found in southern Europe, Asia, and North America as well as Africa and South America. In the USSR it inhabits the southern part of the European USSR and Middle Asia; it migrates to Africa for the winter. The night heron keeps to the banks of rivers or the shores of ponds and lakes. It is active at night. It nests in colonies, usually on trees. There are four or five greenish eggs in a clutch; both parents brood for a period of 21–22 days. Night herons feed on fish, frogs, and small invertebrate animals.

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 2. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A.Gladkov. Moscow, 1951.
References in periodicals archive ?
When a fish was sighted in a wave returning to the ocean, the Black-crowned Night Herons ran down the sand toward the water and usually caught the fish before it washed away into deeper water.
Each of the four interns gathered data for long-standing projects, such monitoring the presence of black-crowned night herons, but also created their own projects that they worked on throughout the summer.
The birds used a great deal of aggression when encountering other Black-crowned Night Herons within close range either at the water's edge or at the top of the bank where passers-by distributed bread.
In addition, the black-crowned night heron and blackpoll warbler, both species of special concern for some time, have been added to the state endangered species list.
According to Daphne Hatch, the park's wildlife biologist, in 1998 Alcatraz provided sanctuary for about 240 Black-Crowned Night Heron and 15 Snowy Egret nests (up from just three the previous year).
The situation is perhaps unique in that human depredation is not a major cause: Spendelow blames a small colony of black-crowned night herons, which eat tern eggs.
The Venice Area Audubon Rookery, mentioned earlier, attracts a variety of birds, including great blue herons, great egrets, snowy egrets, cattle egrets, anhingas, gallinules and yellow-crowned night herons.
An onshore observation point provides a unique setting to witness the nesting habits of the resident cormorants, black-crowned night herons and great blue herons, the latter of which make nearby Fairbank Point their largest coastal rookery between San Francisco and Mexico.
Note that the new trail is open only from mid-September through January, after which it's closed to permit nesting of Western gulls, cormorants, and black-crowned night herons nearby.
Included in this revision are incorporating the night herons in subfamily Ardeinae together with the typical day herons and egrets.
It also has the distinction of being the only colony in the Commonwealth where black-crowned night herons, yellow- crowned night herons and great egrets nest together.