nightingale


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nightingale,

common name for a migratory Old World bird of the family Turdidae (thrush family), celebrated for its vocal powers. The common nightingale of England and Western Europe, Luscinia megarhynchos, is about 6 1-2 in. (16.3 cm) long, reddish-brown above and grayish-white below. It winters in Africa and reaches England about mid-April. Its famous song is delivered only by the male during the breeding season, at any time of day or night. A larger species is found in Eastern Europe. The bulbul, a prodigious songster of Persian literature, was once thought to be a nightingale but has been identified with another family; the Virginia nightingale is a grosbeak; and the Pekin, or Japanese, nightingale belongs to the babbler family. Nightingales are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Turdidae.

nightingale

identified with mortality. [Animal Symbolism: Mercatante, 163]
See: Death

nightingale

immortal bird whose voice has been heard from time immemorial. [Br. Poetry: Keats “Ode to a Nightingale”]

nightingale

1. a brownish European songbird, Luscinia megarhynchos, with a broad reddish-brown tail: well known for its musical song, usually heard at night
2. any of various similar or related birds, such as Luscinia luscinia (thrush nightingale)

Nightingale

Florence, known as the Lady with the Lamp. 1820--1910, English nurse, famous for her work during the Crimean War. She helped to raise the status and quality of the nursing profession and founded a training school for nurses in London (1860)
References in periodicals archive ?
The service included the Florence Nightingale Lamp being carried through the Abbey - Florence Nightingale earned the name "The Lady with the Lamp" as she would visit soldiers at night with a small lantern in her hand during the Crimean War.
He went on to tell respectively how his father read Nightingale's books in the 1980s, and that he, himself, was currently listening to a series of U-Tube tapes from Nightingale's writings.
Nightingale, who chose to represent himself, told the court: "I was commemorating the anniversary of three construction workers who died between September 13 and 17.
Local Area Health Education Centers and independent Nightingale Committees in 10 regions of the state designate up to 60 nurses as Luminaries.
Florence Nightingale was born in Florence, Italy, on May 12, 1820, and was part of a wealthy family, Nightingale defied the expectations of the time and pursued what she saw as her God-given calling of nursing.
uk "And with each seller paying PS10 for their pitch for the day I'm hoping the events will raise a huge amount of cash for Nightingale House Hospice which is a charity that's very close to the hearts of Wrexham people."
Nightingale's ex-wife describes the financial woes of the titular author: "the banks won't let you buy it [a house].
The acquisition of Nightingale's Canadian operations is subject to customary closing conditions, including Nightingale shareholder approval and regulatory approval.
Florence Nightingale today: Healing, Leadership, Global Action (pp.
There is an abundance of information written about the life and times of Florence Nightingale. She is referred to as "The Lady with the Lamp" from her works during the Crimean War and immortalized in a poem, Santa Filomena, written about her by William Wadsworth Longfellow.