nigrescent

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nigrescent

[nī′gres·ənt]
(biology)
Blackish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cross also dropped the Fifth stage (Internalization Commitment Stage) in the revised Nigrescence Model (Cross, 1991, 1995; Cross & Vandiver, 2001).
Nigrescence theory and measurement: Introducing the Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS).
Over time, the theory of nigrescence has evolved beyond a discussion of the individual stages of identity development to multi-dimensional layers of identity, which include consideration of the effects of racial group referencing or belonging on the development of a healthy racial identity (Worrell et al, 2001).
One model that I tend to use is Cross' Model of Nigrescence.
Thousands of years of effort to throw off their nigrescence have failed to eradicate those race characteristics, and the Jew of to-day is essentially Negro in habits, physical peculiarities and tendencies.
the Nigrescence models; Cross, 1995; Cross & Vandiver, in press), American Indians (e.
Variously labeled developmental-process, transformational, or nigrescence theories, reviews of these stage developmental theories are provided by Azibo (1990a), Azibo and Robinson (2004), Constantine, et al.
Application of Cross's Nigrescence theory would have added theoretical depth to the reinvention concept by providing an explanatory model to account for Malcolm's periodic "reinventions.
William Cross' (1995) Model of Psychological Nigrescence (e.
The second major perspective of Black racial identity development consists of the Nigrescence or Black Racial Identity Models (NRID) and is the perspective most widely used.
The Nigrescence model attempted to account "for the progression of African Americans through sequential stages to arrive at a healthy racial identity" (Bellgrave & Allison, 2006, p.
A variety of models and tools are available for understanding and assessing changes in these facets of identity; for example, Atkinson, Morten, and Sue's (1989) Minority Identity Development Model; Brady and Busse's (1994) Gay Identity Questionnaire; and Cross's (1971) Nigrescence Model.