Nimrod

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Nimrod,

in the Bible, descendant of Cush who is recorded as a mighty hunter.

Nimrod

Biblical hunter of great prowess. [O.T.: Genesis 10:9; Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
See: Hunting

Nimrod

Old Testament a hunter, who was famous for his prowess (Genesis 10:8--9)
References in classic literature ?
When the original tribes were dispersed, more than four thousand years ago, Nimrod and a large party traveled three or four hundred miles, and settled where the great city of Babylon afterwards stood.
They broke off fragments from Noah's tomb; from the exquisite sculptures of the temples of Baalbec; from the houses of Judas and Ananias, in Damascus; from the tomb of Nimrod the Mighty Hunter in Jonesborough; from the worn Greek and Roman inscriptions set in the hoary walls of the Castle of Banias; and now they have been hacking and chipping these old arches here that Jesus looked upon in the flesh.
They will be stationed at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray to plug the gap left by the decision to scrap the Nimrods.
A PS4billion contract for nine new Nimrods at RAF Kinloss in Moray was controversially scrapped by David Cameron's government as part of their brutal budget cuts in 2010.
We have an aircraft carrier with no planes and now we are dismantling a fleet of Nimrods which have never been used, costing the taxpayer an extra pounds 200million on top of the pounds 4billion they cost to build.
Union leaders also attacked the Government's controversial decision to scrap the Nimrods.
Gen Richards said the decision to cancel the new Nimrods was "not taken lightly" by ministers and service chiefs.
In an open letter to the Daily Telegraph, former defence chiefs from all three services said that the decision to destroy nine MRA4 Nimrods to save money is "perverse" and could cause serious long-term damage to the country's interests.
27 (BNA) The scrapping of the nine Nimrods surveillance aircraft will impose a massive long term damage to British security interests, the country's leading military figures have warned.
Private contractors will soon begin to dismantle the Nimrods, at an estimated cost to the MoD of pounds 200 million.
As Group Captain, Mr Baber was the leader of the MoD's integrated project team (IPT) responsible for a safety review of the RAF's Nimrods that took place between 2001 and 2005.
As Group Captain, Mr Baber was the leader of the Ministry of Defence integrated project team (IPT) responsible for a safety review of the RAF's Nimrods that took place between 2001 and 2005.