nitrifying bacteria


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Related to nitrifying bacteria: Denitrifying bacteria, Nitrogen fixing bacteria

nitrifying bacteria:

see nitrogen cyclenitrogen cycle,
the continuous flow of nitrogen through the biosphere by the processes of nitrogen fixation, ammonification (decay), nitrification, and denitrification. Nitrogen is vital to all living matter, both plant and animal; it is an essential constituent of amino acids,
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nitrifying bacteria

[′nī·trə‚fī·iŋ bak′tir·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
Members of the family Nitrobacteraceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Copper is an essential trace element in nitrifying bacteria but becomes toxic as concentrations increase to levels that disrupt normal cellular function (Sato et al.
Occurrence of nitrifying bacteria and nitrification in Finnish drinking water distribution system, Water Research 36: 4319-4329.
Under such circumstances, the demand for inorganic nutrients by MPB can be so great that they out-compete the nitrifying bacteria in the aerobic sediments for N[H.
Investigation of nitrification by co-immobilized nitrifying bacteria and zeolite in a batchwise fluidized bed, Water Science and Technology 35(8): 169-175.
Nitrifying bacteria are known to be sensitive to pH, with the optimum around neutral (Strauss et al.
Our preliminary research indicated that nitrifying bacteria protected in pellets could nitrify animal lagoon wastewater at rates comparable to those used in Japan to clean up municipal wastewater systems," says Vanotti.
consumption by heterotrophs and decreasing the substrate for nitrifying bacteria (Ross et al.
5 (Burton and Prosser 2001), and Alexander (1977) stated that numbers of nitrifying bacteria and nitrification activity in soil decline markedly below pH 6.
Where acid-tolerant nitrifying bacteria exist, nitrification can occur at a soil pH as low as 3.
When Nishio and Furusaka (1970, 1971) percolated soil aggregates with ammonium or nitrite solutions, nitrifying bacteria grew more rapidly in the outer parts of aggregates (corresponding to larger pores) than the inner parts of aggregates (corresponding to smaller pores).
At 50[degrees]F, according to the books, nitrifying bacteria begin to go dormant.