nitrogen dioxide


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to nitrogen dioxide: Nitrogen monoxide

nitrogen dioxide

[′nī·trə·jən dī′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
NO2 A reddish-brown gas; it exists in varying degrees of concentration in equilibrium with other nitrogen oxides; used to produce nitric acid. Also known as dinitrogen tetroxide; liquid dioxide; nitrogen peroxide; nitrogen tetroxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report concluded: "Levels of nitrogen dioxide would increase by an imperceptible amount as a result of increased traffic flows.
At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that exposure to nitrogen dioxide during the first and second trimesters was associated with lower pulmonary function growth in both girls and boys in childhood.
Reacts with other pollutants to form nitrogen dioxide.
Nitrogen dioxide is one of the nastiest common pollutants and can cause health problems in anyone with long-term exposure to the levels recorded in one of the Welsh capital's busiest streets.
High levels of nitrogen dioxide found in exhaust fumes can worsen respiratory problems particularly for people already suffering from chest ailments such as chronic bronchitis and asthma.
This table shows latest readings for levels of nitrogen dioxide in the air surrounding airports.
In one part of the country - London's busy Marylebone Road - levels of nitrogen dioxide were almost three times the target set by the Government.
Today new research shows that in children the risk is heightened by exposure to the air pollutant nitrogen dioxide, produced by vehicle exhausts.
The EPA measures carbon monoxide, ozone, particulate matter, lead, nitrogen dioxide - which the South Coast was rid of nearly a decade ago, the last area in the nation to meet that standard - and sulfur dioxide, which is not a problem for the South Coast region.
A shocking report to be published next month by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency says levels of dangerous gases, such as nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and ozone, are soaring.
Only 13 of Japan's 47 prefectures have met the environmental standards restricting the amount of nitrogen dioxide and suspended particulate matter (SPM) emitted in exhaust fumes from factories and cars, according to a report released Tuesday by the Environment Agency.
Nowak's urban forest effects model, called UFORE-D, calculates how many grams of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide are deposited in tree canopies each hour, as well as how much particulate matter smaller than 10 microns is deposited each day.