no-go area

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no-go area

a district in a town that is barricaded off, usually by a paramilitary organization, within which the police, army, etc., can only enter by force
References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier during proceedings, the Chief Justice remarked that it seemed like the report regarding no-go areas in Karachi was not prepared seriously, adding that if the police claims there are no no-go areas in Karachi they should be held responsible for any murders that occur across the city.
He further said that wherever there was "writ of any other person except the government" that was a no-go area.
There is no such thing as a no-go area in Liverpool.
I do not believe there are any no-go areas and if there are let him (Bishop Nazir-Ali) point them out.
Speaking in Downing Street, Mr Brown said: "I know that there are pressures in many areas of the country but I don't accept that there are no-go areas.
Speaking to media persons here, outspoken PLM-N leader said there is no place in the province which could be called no-go area adding that the government would not allow anyone including Tahirul Qadri to make such areas in heart of Lahore.
The storm was sparked when he said: "In many societies, whether developed or developing, there are communities within the societies which develop which become no-go areas.
KARACHI, June 01, 2011 (Regional Times): No-go areas in Karachi are serving as hideouts of terrorists, and even law and enforcing agencies have no easy access to these areas.
As a general rule we should treat referees as no-go areas and learn from other sports.
Five parts of Canton, Fairwater, Rhiwbina, Tremorfa, Splott and Llanrumney, have been added to a list of city centre streets earmarked to become no-go areas for drinkers.
The Bishop of Rochester, who was born in Pakistan, has stated that he believes areas of the UK are becoming no-go areas for people who aren't muslims.
TOWN and city centres are becoming no-go areas after dark, with drunken yobs behaving like "an occupying army loose in the streets", says the chairman of a House of Commons committee.