noble metal


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

noble metal

[′nō·bəl ′med·əl]
(metallurgy)
A metal, or alloy, such as gold, silver, or platinum having high resistance to corrosion and oxidation; used in the construction of thin-film circuits, metal-film resistors, and other metal-film devices.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, the loading amount of a noble metal catalyst greatly influences the performance.
Noble metals resist oxidation and include many of the precious metals, such as platinum, palladium, iridium and gold.
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin have discovered a cheap and efficient alternative to the use of noble gases as a catalyst in hydrogen production -- a combination of phosphorus and sulfur (common elements) and cobalt, a metal 1,000 times cheaper than the cheapest noble metals.
Typical roles for Tegal's etching systems used in MEMS and biochip fabrication include producing structures in silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide, in organic materials like BCB and polyimide and in noble metals, like platinum and gold.
As well as the economic ramifications this technology may have, this ability to make a `crop of gold' opens up the way for the phyto- extraction of other noble metals.
Catalytic combustion using raised temperatures (392-752F/200-400C) and supported catalyst beds, often used with noble metals such as platinum or palladium, can be very effective in reducing fumes to basic elemental constituents including nitrogen and hydrogen, and eliminating VOCS.
It is also significant that the catalyst can break the carbon-hydrogen bonds in hydrocarbons such as cyclohexane, the precursor of nylon, without using noble metals.
There are no noble metals involved, so it should be very cheap," he said.
Current fuels cells operate at a red-hot 800+ degrees Celsius, which requires the use of expensive noble metals.
According to ECD Ovonics, the work will focus on Ovonic's Metal Hydride Fuel Cell technology, which does not utilize noble metals traditionally used as catalysts for fuel cells.