noble

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Related to nobleness: ennoble

noble

1. of or relating to a hereditary class with special social or political status, often derived from a feudal period
2. Chem
a. (of certain elements) chemically unreactive
b. (of certain metals, esp copper, silver, and gold) resisting oxidation
3. Falconry
a. designating long-winged falcons that capture their quarry by stooping on it from above
b. designating the type of quarry appropriate to a particular species of falcon
4. a person belonging to a privileged social or political class whose status is usually indicated by a title conferred by sovereign authority or descent
5. (in the British Isles) a person holding the title of duke, marquess, earl, viscount, or baron, or a feminine equivalent
6. a former Brit gold coin having the value of one third of a pound
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Richard Johnson, in The Nine Worthies of London (1592), indicates that nobles are not necessarily "kinges and mightie potentates," but those whose "vertues made them great, and whose renowne sprung not of the noblenes of their birth, but of the notable toowardnesse of their well qualified mindes; advaunced not with loftie titles, but praysed for the triall of their heroycal truthes" (439).
On January 24, 1856, Thoreau meditated in his Journal on elms, the species that is the subject of the first entry in Wild Fruits: "I find that into my idea of the village has entered more of the elm that of the human being" for most people do not have "a tithe of the dignity, the true nobleness and comprehensiveness of view" that they do.
his reactionary screed on the passage of the Second Reform Act in 1867--Carlyle writes, "Speech issuing in no deed is hateful and contemptible:--how can a man have any nobleness who knows not that?
According to the Quranic verses and Prophetic traditions, marriage endows humans with nobleness and respectfulness.
In relation to the playfulness with which he delivers Francaix's concerto, I would like to point out that if it is assumed that we can only toy with something we have under absolute control, he holds sway over the clarinet part with admirable refinement and nobleness.
The aim of great exhibitions was therefore to offer education to visitors so that they would achieve John Stuart Mill's 'general cultivation of nobleness of character'.
The nobleness of this love partly, perhaps wholly, derives from the lovers' being nobles and not commoners.
Their "dignity and delicate charm" is owed partly to real nobleness of feature and chiefly to the grace, mingled severity of the falling lines of the thin drapery.
Media across the world lauded the Royal Pardon of His Majesty and analysts said that the "pardon is an evidence of the nobleness of His Majesty the Sultan and reflects his initiatives that have created an atmosphere of optimism in the society.
But a poverty which is an elevation, a nobleness, a virtue.
Patience, balance, competitiveness, enjoyment, flexibility, well-being, clarity, precision, confidence, fitness, belonging, nobleness, grace, discipline, strength, persistency, resilience, honesty, integrity and fulfilment are only some of the treasures that fencing can hold for anyone.
In Fors Clavigera Letter 26 (February 1873), Ruskin writes of Emerson that "No modern person has truer instinct for heroism than he: nay, he is the only man I know of, among all who ever looked at books of mine, who had nobleness enough to understand and believe the story of Tumer's darkening his own picture that it might not take the light out of Lawrence's" (27.