Candidate

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Candidate

 

(1) An individual contending or being considered for a governmental or public post (such as a presidential candidate or legislative candidate) or any position.

(2) In prerevolutionary Russia, individuals who completed with distinction studies in a university or in any equivalent higher education establishment (lyceum, academy), and presented written work on their chosen theme. The degree of kandidat was introduced in 1804; although it was abolished by the 1884 statutes, it was retained up until 1917 in Warsaw and Iur’ev (Tartu) universities, Demidov Lyceum (Iaroslavl’), and ecclesiastical academies, which were not affected by the statutes. The degree was used in combination with the name of the education establishment or branch of learning (for instance, kandidat Moskovskogo Universiteta or kandidat slovesnosti [candidate inphilology]); on entering governmental service the holder of thedegree was entitled to a rank of the tenth class (kollezhskii sekretar’ collegiate secretary). Another title was kandidat kommertsii (candidate in commerce), which was awarded to individuals who completed with distinction studies at the St. Petersburg or Kharkov commercial schools.

References in periodicals archive ?
But when Democrats nominate a candidate from the Northeast, particularly from New England, especially Massachusetts, there is a presumption of liberalism, and the burden of proof is on the Democrat to prove that he or she is a mainstream candidate and not a hopeless and unrepentant liberal.
As Volokh wrote on his Web site: ``Any social science, history, philosophy, law, and theology professor, judge, or legislator in any country (plus a few others) can nominate anyone for a Nobel Peace Prize (past nominees, just in 1901-1951, included Hitler, Stalin, and Molotov).
Famed Atlanta baseball pitcher and SouthernLINC Wireless spokesperson John Smoltz called for nominations in June, yielding broad interest from neighbors, friends, spouses, siblings and coworkers wanting to nominate their personal heroes for a variety of selfless acts.