nominative


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nominative

(nŏm`ĭnətĭv), [Lat.,=naming], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 usually employed for the nounnoun
[Lat.,=name], in English, part of speech of vast semantic range. It can be used to name a person, place, thing, idea, or time. It generally functions as subject, object, or indirect object of the verb in the sentence, and may be distinguished by a number of formal criteria.
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 that is the subject of the sentence. The term is used in the grammar of languages with Latinlike features, but the case may in fact have different functions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Heptanesian (8), +human male loanwords are accommodated as masculine nouns in -os, -is, -as, -es in the citation form of nominative singular (8a-d), while +human female ones are feminine, ending in -a (8e,f).
In the dictionary by Tsvetkov (1995), written at the beginning of the 20th century, the nominative has a short final vowel or no final vowel at all, the partitive usually ends in a short vowel (with some exceptions), and the genitive and illative show variation (sometimes rather confusing) in the length of the final vowel between different lexemes: ein 'hay:NOM', eina' 'hay:GEN/ill', eina 'hay:PART'; kana 'fish:NOM/gen/part', kanase 'fish:iLL'; tara 'garden:NOM/GEN', tara 'garden:PART', tarase 'garden:iLL'; vasar 'hammer:NOM', vasara 'hammer:GEN', vasara 'hammer:PART', vasara(se) 'hammer:iLL'.
Despite apparent similarities in the nominative singular form (ending in -a), however, lexemes such as tuba 'room; house' and aiga 'edge' follow slightly different inflexional patterns:
The chairman of the six nominative districts, Elder Johnson Teah says the appointment is 'a big mistake' and so they are preparing to shortly meet with President Weah on the issue.
A particularly illustrative example is the distinction of plural nominative and accusative forms of demonstrative pronouns and definite articles, which have already levelled their case distinctions in Old High German (Braune & Reiffenstein 2004: 247) and their gender distinctions in Early New High German (Ebert et al 1993: 218) to a single form die.
This will ensure that all command sergeants major/sergeants major have equal opportunities and that the very best will continue to advance to the nominative level.
By disregarding the question of neuter in the gender system, Jakobson allows himself to refer to the zero desinence of Dec11, in singular nominative, as the characteristic representative of this declension since he does not need to consider the neuters with their -o desinence in singular nominative.
Keywords: Pashto; nominative Case; accusative Case; monotransitives; split-ergativity.
Particularly when you consider that in less than a year our national finances could well be in the hands of that prime example of nominative determinism, Ed Balls.
A nominative use refers to the trademark holder or her product.
The subjects of intransitive verbs always take Nominative or Dative case.
Apparently (ie a couple of random Google searches say) it's a phenomenon known as nominative determinism, by which if your name is Baker you're more likely to become a baker.