nominative


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nominative

(nŏm`ĭnətĭv), [Lat.,=naming], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 usually employed for the nounnoun
[Lat.,=name], in English, part of speech of vast semantic range. It can be used to name a person, place, thing, idea, or time. It generally functions as subject, object, or indirect object of the verb in the sentence, and may be distinguished by a number of formal criteria.
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 that is the subject of the sentence. The term is used in the grammar of languages with Latinlike features, but the case may in fact have different functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jakobson describes this expression distinction by reference to the nominative singular desinences only; however, on a systemic level it is the contrast between the full set of desinences of Dec11 (singular), excluding the declension of neuters with sg.
In Modern Finnish, a typical BECOME-construction consists of a nominative subject NP, the verb tulla, and a translative AP (Poika [boy.
The [u] of T are valued as 3rd person singular male while nominative Case is assigned to the nominal pen.
In these examples, we have a lexical base followed by an inflective morpheme (Layer I, -es-, -a- or -(j)en-) marking nominative vs.
In the first Votic grammar, written by Ahlqvist (1856 : 32), the nominative singular forms usually end in a short vowel (e.
Keywords: Pashto; nominative Case; accusative Case; monotransitives; split-ergativity.
Particularly when you consider that in less than a year our national finances could well be in the hands of that prime example of nominative determinism, Ed Balls.
A nominative use refers to the trademark holder or her product.
The subjects of intransitive verbs always take Nominative or Dative case.
In (7)b the nominative subject (students) of the embedded clause moves to SpecCP and deletes uT in C, whereas in (7)a that moves to C, it is the realization of T to C movement and deletes uT in C.
I had quite a time of it explaining to a work colleague that, yes, the Queen is right to say, "My husband and I (have enjoyed this performance)," but only because she puts it in the nominative.
The subject of a verb is always in the nominative (I, you, he, she, it, we, they, who, whoever).