nominative

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Related to nominative case: objective case, accusative case

nominative

(nŏm`ĭnətĭv), [Lat.,=naming], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 usually employed for the nounnoun
[Lat.,=name], in English, part of speech of vast semantic range. It can be used to name a person, place, thing, idea, or time. It generally functions as subject, object, or indirect object of the verb in the sentence, and may be distinguished by a number of formal criteria.
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 that is the subject of the sentence. The term is used in the grammar of languages with Latinlike features, but the case may in fact have different functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus it substantiates the hypothesis that phi-features agreement between T and the nominal results in nominative Case assigned to the subject DPs here.
As a result of the agree relation nominative Case is assigned to the DP baran.
The assertion that the nominative case in some Samoyedic languages denotes definiteness of an object belongs only to N.
Nominative case is assigned to the Subject [NP, S] by the AGR element of INFL which governs the [NP, S] position.
If full agreement takes place between T and pro in spec-vP, how does the DP in spec-T get its nominative case assigned?
Therefore the nominative case must possess the same number and gender agreement.
are homonymous in the nominative case, they inflect differently in other cases (see Werner 1997a : 132-133).
As opposed to accusative case, there is no reason to assume that nominative case assignment in Hebrew is different from nominative in other languages or that nominative in Hebrew isn't structural.
With transitive verbs the nominative case contrasts with the accusative case (= III).
Likewise, in certain Finnish constructions direct objects receive nominative case, and most of the embedded English zero-marked direct objects occur without determiners, just like those with overt case (pp.
Byrne 1987) that a signals nominative case, and hen accusative case:
One scholar who is not always courteous to the Arabic grammarians (see above) is Ramzi Baalbaki who in the course of a discussion of what he terms coalescence in Sibawaih, the merger of two words to form a single unit of some sort, questions the validity of Sibawaiyh's explanation of the nominative case of dariifun in la yulaama dariif-un laka `you have no kind boy'.