nominative

(redirected from nominative case)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to nominative case: objective case, accusative case

nominative

(nŏm`ĭnətĭv), [Lat.,=naming], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
..... Click the link for more information.
 usually employed for the nounnoun
[Lat.,=name], in English, part of speech of vast semantic range. It can be used to name a person, place, thing, idea, or time. It generally functions as subject, object, or indirect object of the verb in the sentence, and may be distinguished by a number of formal criteria.
..... Click the link for more information.
 that is the subject of the sentence. The term is used in the grammar of languages with Latinlike features, but the case may in fact have different functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The element Gianni is displaced in a pre-verbal position where it can receive the NOMINATIVE case and function as subject and the ACCUSATIVE case is not assigned since one argument can only accept one case.
The pivot can then be realized as a subject, as it must, bearing nominative case.
According to row 3, a predicate with a nominative argument is to be found because, according to row 4, this stem is a common noun which "seems" to be in the nominative case.
Nominative case marking much more frequently marks subjects of verbs rather than objects of verbs.
The nominative case forms present in pure form (a) monosyllabic vocalic stems ending in a long vowel or a diphthong, and (b) disyllabic a/e/a-stems (the stem in both nominative singular and nominative plural forms), (c) mostly adjectival i- and i-stems that have in the genitive a parallel pure stem ending iz or iz, which occurs also in most other cases except in four plural case forms where z occurs instead of z, (d) a few words ending in u, o, and o, characteristically with somewhat aberrant morphology, (e) consonantal stems among which the greater part of polysyllabic z-stems have in the genitive singular a parallel disyllabic vocalic stem.
iv) "The Verb to Behas always a Nominative Case after it; as 'it was I, not He, that did it'" (Lowth 1763:115).
This is captured with feature co-occurrence restrictions prohibiting these case features from co-occurring with a nominative case feature: (16)
46, kartr is marked by the first or nominative case endings in the active, and karman by the same endings in the passive" (p.
In this case, by analogy with Voru and North Estonian forms, we could expect in other nominative case forms only a single conso nant [dagger]j as the reflex of the weak grade cluster * ht, cf.
Case marking: in active sentences, agents are normally coded in the nominative case and patients in the accusative case.
Feoktistov states that the form is to express attributive function of nominative case ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.