nominative

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nominative

(nŏm`ĭnətĭv), [Lat.,=naming], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 usually employed for the nounnoun
[Lat.,=name], in English, part of speech of vast semantic range. It can be used to name a person, place, thing, idea, or time. It generally functions as subject, object, or indirect object of the verb in the sentence, and may be distinguished by a number of formal criteria.
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 that is the subject of the sentence. The term is used in the grammar of languages with Latinlike features, but the case may in fact have different functions.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the dictionary by Tsvetkov (1995), written at the beginning of the 20th century, the nominative has a short final vowel or no final vowel at all, the partitive usually ends in a short vowel (with some exceptions), and the genitive and illative show variation (sometimes rather confusing) in the length of the final vowel between different lexemes: ein 'hay:NOM', eina' 'hay:GEN/ill', eina 'hay:PART'; kana 'fish:NOM/gen/part', kanase 'fish:iLL'; tara 'garden:NOM/GEN', tara 'garden:PART', tarase 'garden:iLL'; vasar 'hammer:NOM', vasara 'hammer:GEN', vasara 'hammer:PART', vasara(se) 'hammer:iLL'.
A grammar by ArpaHaT (2007 : 45) states that the genitive and illative have a prolonged final vowel, the partitive forms with the -a marker end in a long vowel (the author gives the example kanaa 'fish:PART', but elsewhere in the same grammar only the form kanna is found), and the nominative has a short final vowel.
the nominative is more natural than the accusative.
If the language distinguishes between the nominative and the accusative of the personal-pronoun subject such that one case shows subject-verb agreement and the other case does not show agreement, then it is the nominative that tends to show agreement and it is the accusative that tends not to show agreement.
For example, a nominative NP, a locative NP, a dative NP and an accusative NP may all depend on a verb to follow.
Miyamoto reported that people read a clause-initial nominative-nominative sequence slower than either a clause-initial nominative-accusative sequence or a clause-initial accusative-nominative sequence, and attributed this slowdown to the hypothesis that nominative in Japanese induces a clause-boundary.
Thus there remains a principal opportunity that respective interpretations of nominatives, offered by N.
Samoyedic languages commonly use three cases for the direct object: *m-accusative, unmarked nominative and rarely *n-genitive.
In experiment I with unambiguous case markers it is shown that the typically developing children proceed from animacy to the nominative (predominantly in coalition with the initial NP) to agreement, while in the second experiment with ambiguous case markers these children turn from animacy to the initial NP and then to agreement.
For instance, with regard to marking the nominative and accusative, only the markers for masculine singular nominative-accusative are contrastive while those for feminine and neuter nouns in the singular are homonymous.
8) There is also a relation between the partitive singulars that are homophonous with short illatives and those that correspond to truncated nominatives.
The pivotal role of these 'principal parts' is recognized in traditional descriptions, which tend to distinguish three basic forms: the nominative, genitive and partitive singular (though the class of many nouns can be identified from the genitive or partitive singular alone).