non-A, non-B hepatitis


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non-A, non-B hepatitis

[‚nän ¦ā ‚nän ¦bē ‚hep·ə′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
A type of viral hepatitis that is most common among people who have received transfused blood and whose serologic tests show no evidence of hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or other types of virus such as Epstein-Barr.
References in periodicals archive ?
Failure to detect chronic liver disease after epidemic non-A, non-B hepatitis.
This "library" of bacteriophage-expressed polypeptides was subsequently screened against the serum of a patient with documented chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis.
and colleagues at the NIH Clinical Center ultimately provided the link between the bacteriophage-expressed polypeptide, the antibody that reacted to it, and non-A, non-B hepatitis.
Harvey Alter and colleagues assessed the value of ALT and anti-HBc as surrogate markers for non-A, non-B hepatitis (now hepatitis C).
Harvey Alter of NIH), and associates at the CDC studied 140 patients who had non-A, non-B hepatitis.
Statistical analysis subsequently revealed that the factors associated with increased risk of non-A, non-B hepatitis included a lower level of education, household or sexual activity with a person who had had hepatitis within the previous year, and heterosexual activity with more than two partners.
Furthermore use of the test should shed light on whether other agents can cause non-A, non-B hepatitis, Houghton says.
In a previous study on the Italian island of Sardinia -- where hepatitis B infection is 30 times more common than in the United States and so is easier to study -- Vyas and co-workers Eliana Lai and Annalena Figus found that one-third of chronic liver disease victims diagnosed as having non-A, non-B hepatitis carried mutant forms of hepatitis B undetectable by standard tests for the virus.
High levels of ALT indicate liver injury and provide today's sole criterion for diagnosing non-A, non-B hepatitis, Vyas says.
So, although these 68 individuals would have been misdiagnosed with non-A, non-B hepatitis, their blood would not have been transfused.
Scientists have known for two decades that several agents can cause non-A, non-B hepatitis.
Chronic hepatitis develops in 30 to 50 percent of those with blood-borne non-A, non-B hepatitis, and 20 percent of chronic carriers go on to develop cirrhosis.