suture

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suture

1. Surgery
a. catgut, silk thread, or wire used to stitch together two bodily surfaces
b. the surgical seam formed after joining two surfaces
2. Anatomy a type of immovable joint, esp between the bones of the skull (cranial suture)
3. Zoology a line of junction in a mollusc shell, esp the line between adjacent chambers of a nautiloid shell
4. Botany a line marking the point of dehiscence in a seed pod or capsule

Suture

 

the surgical uniting, chiefly by a surgical needle and suture material, of tissues cut during surgery or separated by an injury. Threads made of silk, linen, or Dacron and other polymeric materials are used in superficial sutures. In buried sutures, which are applied to internal organs and tissues, absorbable materials, such as catgut or biologically inert polymeric threads, are used; buried sutures are not removed.

One type of superficial suture, cosmetic suture, which is applied to the face, is made using threads of horsehair or thin ca-pron. Osteorrhaphy (osteosynthesis) is a type of buried suture. Primary, primo-secondary, and secondary sutures are distinguished on the basis of when the sutures are applied, which depends on the type of wound. The sutureless union of tissues is achieved with various adhesives made from polymeric materials (for example, cyanoacrylate) or with metal clamps.

suture

[′sü·chər]
(biology)
A distinguishable line of union between two closely united parts.
(medicine)
A fine thread used to close a wound or surgical incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reapproximate the broken edges of pubocervical fascia and rectovaginal septum anteriorly and posteriorly with two layers of permanent nonabsorbable sutures, restoring the integrity of the fibromuscular vaginal tube.
There was no statistically significant difference between absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures in short- or long-term cosmetic outcome.
Flood, Robert; Eyal, Dalit; Saludades, John; Hayes, Ciana; Gaughan, John Cosmetic Outcomes of Absorbable Versus Nonabsorbable Sutures in Pediatric Facial Lacerations.
The tear was repaired using a modified Kessler method with strong nonabsorbable sutures.
Traditionally, several rows of internal nonabsorbable sutures are placed, starting at the left uterosacral ligament, then incorporating the peritoneum of the cul-desac, and ending in the right uterosacral ligament (FIGURE 1).
Slowly absorbable or nonabsorbable sutures were considered appropriate for sphincter repair.
Our results are based on a general Danish population, where the recommendation is to repair primary small (less than 2 cm) umbilical hernias with nonabsorbable sutures using open technique and to repair recurrences and all incisional hernias with a mesh, either laparoscopically or by open technique.
In such applications, it offers less traumatic closure than do commonly used options such as nonabsorbable sutures or staples.
Table 4-2: Selected Nonabsorbable Sutures by Manufacturers and Product
After 2 weeks of surgery, suture removal was carried out for the patients with nonabsorbable sutures and follow up was done for the patients with absorbable sutures.
The implant is then secured with nonabsorbable sutures passed through holes drilled in the bone surrounding the well.