nonconformity


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nonconformity

[¦nän·kən′fȯr·məd·ē]
(geology)
A type of unconformity in which rocks below the surface of unconformity are either igneous or metamorphic.
References in periodicals archive ?
All caricatures have an element of truth of course, but are popular perceptions of Welsh nonconformity entirely accurate?
These four sections walk the reader through the history of Nonconformity in the words of those involved, and are followed by three more which flesh-out the interests and concerns of the various movements: "Part V: Aspects of Nonconformist Experience" presents the interests in personal conversion and the subjective experience of the faith which dominated Nonconformist concerns; "Part VI: A Theological Miscellany" pans the range of theological concerns which were behind the various movements; and "Part VII: Poetry" includes a few hymns as well as selections from Milton.
To explain the changes from a religious standpoint, Morgan devotes a chapter to historians of Welsh Protestant Nonconformity. It is an erudite look at the historical perspective of historians and theologians who began to use the manuscript collections and sources in a new, disciplined way.
"We think environmental factors and genetics drive other mechanisms, like exposure to sex hormones in the womb, to shape differences in gender nonconformity and sexuality simultaneously," he said.
Lewis Lloyd, in his study The Port of Caernarfon 1793-1900 says this was simply personal antagonism, as the report's authors were strong churchmen and Tories, and as such could not stand William Francis' liberalism and nonconformity.
The CROs have achieved this prestigious certification in one go without any nonconformity.
He argues that participants' strategies towards cultural life were dominated by withdrawal and nonconformity in the early 1950s, accompanied by a heavy-handed approach by the SED, but that by the mid-1960s the three groups of actors had developed a high degree of communication and interdependence.
Her radicalism was that of the late Victorian era and drew on the more radical traditions of English Nonconformity. As such it was centred on individual liberty and practical changes to improve the quality of life for as many people as possible, rather than on theoretical 'constructs'.
Radical Religion from Shakespeare to Milton: Figures of Nonconformity in Early Modern England.
The second is to demonstrate that fictional representations of religious dissent sought to represent the "social and discursive repercussions of radical religious nonconformity" (14).
Both chubby and no longer young, they admire West for her gleeful nonconformity and unique character: "She's the movie-star equivalent of Venice." Charlie, it turns out, had met the star as a 17-year-old fan and spent a few afternoons poring over his scrapbooks with her.
Now that avant-garde attitudes have become corporate mantras, imagine refinement and inwardness as the latest style in nonconformity. Stranger things have happened.