nondimensional parameter

nondimensional parameter

[¦nän·di′men·chən·əl pə′ram·əd·ər]
(mathematics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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[tau]* = nondimensional parameter relating to time, dimensionless
Figures 14(b)-14(f) reveal that as the RBCs approach the constriction section, the nondimensional parameter W/L of RBCs has a substantial change until they leave the constriction area.
The variation in velocity is represented as a nondimensional parameter, that is, as u/[u.sup.*], where u* is the bed shear velocity or friction velocity corresponding to the individual channel condition and u is the longitudinal point velocity at the particular grid point.
An important notion here is that the key output variables in nondimensional form are determined by only three input parameters, the nondimensional radius of the secondary coating die [R.sub.2]/[R.sub.1], the nondimensional parameter [alpha] representing the pressure-driven velocity relative to the fiber drawing speed, and the viscosity ratio [beta] = [[mu].sub.1/[[mu].sub.2].
The actual volume flow through the compressor is expressed as a nondimensional parameter flow coefficient, defined as the ratio of radial velocity to the peripheral velocity at the impeller exit.
The actual volume flow through the compressor is expressed as a nondimensional parameter flow coefficient [phi], defined as the ratio of radial velocity to the peripheral velocity at the impeller exit.
The closed-form expressions of the electrical signals in the half-T network are given by means of both a nondimensional parameter K (the cell factor), which identifies the type of the cell, and some polynomials in K, whose order is linked to the number of the cells and whose coefficients are also written in a closed form.[1, 2] From an electrical point of view, the half-square network is considered completely equivalent to the half-T network, given as
Also, [[delta].sup.max.sub.m] refers to the maximum value of the effective separation attained during the loading history, and a is a nondimensional parameter that defines the rate of damage evolution.
Since the minimum thickness of the fluid film is very small compared with the length L, the nondimensional parameter [epsilon] is a very small quantity.
Note that a is a nondimensional parameter of stenosis height, defined as a = [delta]/[R.sub.0], where [delta] is depth of stenosis.
The following nondimensional parameter [bar.[K.sub.s]] varying from 1 to 10 is used to define the substrate-stiffness parameter: