nonevaporable water

nonevaporable water

The water that is chemically combined during cement hydration; not removable by specified drying.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Liu and Li [11] found that increasing steel slag fineness enhanced its early exothermic rate and increased early hydration heat and nonevaporable water content.
The nonevaporable water ([W.sub.n]) content of hardened paste was obtained from the mass difference between the sample dried at 105[degrees]C and heated at 1000[degrees]C corrected for the loss from the ignition of the unhydrated sample.
Additionally, the nonevaporable water content of the hardened paste containing fine steel slag powder is close to that of hardened plain cement paste at late ages [20, 21].
In this study, loss-on-ignition measurements of nonevaporable water content of the hydrated cement pastes were used [20].
Nonevaporable water content is usually used to characterize the degree of cement hydration.
Determination of Nonevaporable Water. The hardening process in concrete is caused by chemical reaction taking place in the cement part of the mixture.
To evaluate the hydration process of ordinary cement pastes and cement pastes with various Ti[O.sub.2] nanoparticles under different curing temperatures, the nonevaporable water chemically bounded in hydration products was calculated to determine the degree of cement hydration at 3, 7, 28, and 56 days of curing [12, 15].
The addition of fly ash to cement pastes results in changes in the nonevaporable water content of the paste.
Chloride ion permeability test was carried out according to ASTM C1202, "Standard Test Method for Electrical Indication of Concrete's Ability to Resist Chloride Ion Penetration." The nonevaporable water content values of the paste were obtained as the mass differences between the samples heated at 105[degrees]C and 1000[degrees]C.
The nonevaporable water ([w.sub.n]) content of paste was calculated as the mass difference between the samples dried at 105[degrees]C and heated at 1000[degrees]C normalized by the mass after being dried at 105[degrees]C and correcting for the loss on ignition of unhydrated samples [42].
Nonevaporable water content ([w.sub.n]) was obtained by calculating the mass difference between the samples heated at 105[degrees]C and 1000[degrees]C normalized by the mass after heating at 105[degrees]C and correcting for the loss on ignition of unhydrated samples [32].